CNBC Make It.
CNBC Make It.
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How Nintendo Switch Became The Top-Selling Console In America
How Nintendo Switch Became The Top-Selling Console In America
2 dagen geleden
Over the last 40 years, Nintendo has provided countless hours of video gaming entertainment. But with the rise of the Switch, the company took a huge step forward. And during the coronavirus pandemic in 2020, finding one was harder than finding toilet paper. Here’s how the Nintendo Switch took the gaming world by surprise and became one of the most popular consoles on the market. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Nintendo Switch Became The Top-Selling Console In America
Should You Foster A Pet To Manage Stress?
Should You Foster A Pet To Manage Stress?
4 dagen geleden
"This is a really, really hard time for a lot of people. There is huge uncertainty, many people are feeling financial stress, many people are feeling more isolated because they can't do the things that normally let them connect to people," says Manwell Family Professor of Life Sciences (Psychology) at Amherst College, Catherine Sanderson. But one silver lining to the ongoing pandemic is that foster and adoption numbers have been on the rise. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, more than 600 people applied to foster an animal in NY and LA from March 15-31. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Should You Foster A Pet To Manage Stress?
Living On $145K A Year In Austin, Texas | Millennial Money
Living On $145K A Year In Austin, Texas | Millennial Money
6 dagen geleden
Andrea Contreras, 31, lives in Austin, Texas and earns $145,000 a year as a social media advisor at GoDaddy. Five years ago she had a negative bank balance, but Andrea recently purchased her first home. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Andrea''s budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/2AbTnGF Looking around her one-bedroom apartment, Andrea Contreras gazes from the guitar collection on the wall to the Gucci-inspired sweatshirt her Yorkie mix, Kuzco, wears. She can’t believe it’s all hers. “Five years ago, I had nothing,” the 31-year-old remembers. Years of partying in her early 20s landed Contreras in a dark place: She had no money, no support system and no goals for her future. But today, things look vastly different. Contreras has family and friends to turn to in hard times and a career she enjoys. Plus, her apartment is full of furniture and keepsakes that she bought herself. “It’s such a blessing to see everything in here, when I had literally nothing,” she says. As a social media advisor at GoDaddy, Contreras sells social media assistance programs to small business clients across the U.S. She earns a base salary of just $20,000, but with commissions from her sales, she pulled in around $145,000 before taxes last year. She not only lives well in Austin, Texas, and supports herself financially, but she’s comfortable with the direction her life is going. “If I want to go on vacation, I can take a vacation. If I want to help someone out, I can help someone out,” she says. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $145K A Year In Austin, Texas | Millennial Money
What It’s Like Flying Cross-Country Right Now
What It’s Like Flying Cross-Country Right Now
7 dagen geleden
The CDC guidelines state "staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others from getting sick." However, some folks have to fly. Here's what it's like to fly during the coronavirus pandemic and how to keep yourself safe. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt What It’s Like Flying Cross-Country Right Now
How Much Money Do You Need To Earn To Be Happy?
How Much Money Do You Need To Earn To Be Happy?
8 dagen geleden
There's a link between how much money we make and how satisfied we are with our lives. An often cited 2010 study about salary and happiness found that our happiness increases up until we reach the $75,000 mark. Then, it plateaus. We spoke with top happiness experts to see how that finding holds up and to find out how much you need to earn to be happy. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Much Money Do You Need To Earn To Be Happy?
What It’s Like To Graduate Into A Recession
What It’s Like To Graduate Into A Recession
12 dagen geleden
CNBC Make It spoke with college seniors and new graduates who have had their full-time job offers rescinded because of the coronavirus and asked graduates from the Great Recession what advice they had to share for the class of 2020. The class of 2020 has become known as the class of COVID-19. Because of the coronavirus pandemic, these students have been forced to cut their college careers short, give up traditional graduation ceremonies and begin their professional careers during the most hostile labor market since the Great Depression. Many have also had their first full-time job offers revoked. “This is much worse than the Great Recession. Over the entire Great Recession I think maybe 8.5, 9 million jobs were lost over the course of a 5-year period. Between February and April, the United States lost 21.5 million payroll jobs,” says Gary Burtless, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. “And so now, people graduating this spring are going to face the worst job market in the entire post-depression history.” Since March, 38.6 million Americans have lost their jobs and in April, the national unemployment rate was 14.7%. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt What It’s Like To Graduate Into A Recession
Kevin O’Leary Reacts: Living On $1.6 Million A Year In Los Angeles | Millennial Money
Kevin O’Leary Reacts: Living On $1.6 Million A Year In Los Angeles | Millennial Money
14 dagen geleden
“Shark Tank” investor Kevin O’Leary takes a look at how real estate investor and NLmind star Graham Stephan handles his money. The 30-year-old earned more than $1.6 million last year and saved about 99% of it. What’s your budget breakdown? Share your story with us for a chance to be featured in a future installment. cnb.cx/32TYZ2K Watch more Millennial Money here: bit.ly/2ziJXZL For more tactical advice from Mr. Wonderful watch #MoneyDisputes premiering today on www.cnbc.com/money-dispute/. Locked in a money battle? #AskKevin. Real stories, real solutions. Tell Kevin your story. Check out Kevin O'Leary's channel here: nlmind.info » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Kevin O’Leary Reacts: Living On $1.6 Million A Year In Los Angeles | Millennial Money
How Crocs Became An Unlikely Billion-Dollar Brand
How Crocs Became An Unlikely Billion-Dollar Brand
15 dagen geleden
These are Crocs. And a lot of people think they’re really ugly. People who love to hate Crocs had cause to celebrate in 2008, when investors were writing the company off as a passing fad. Crocs lost over $185 million that year and cut 2,000 jobs. The stock plunged to just over $1 a share from a high of about $69 a year earlier. But over the next decade, Crocs would go on to sell 700 million pairs of shoes worldwide. Recently, the clogs have have been strutting down runways at luxury fashion shows. Celebrities like Justin Bieber, Ariana Grande and Post Malone are wearing the shoes. It’s a top brand among Gen Z. And limited edition Crocs are selling for up to $1,000 on the resale market. Crocs have become... a collector’s item. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Crocs Became An Unlikely Billion-Dollar Brand
What Covid-19 Disparities Mean To Black Doctors & Nurses
What Covid-19 Disparities Mean To Black Doctors & Nurses
19 dagen geleden
On April 22nd, the Center for Disease Control reported that one in three patients hospitalized with Covid-19 were African American. “The big piece in that is remembering that this is not unexpected. This is not a surprise,” said University of Pittsburg assistant professor of medicine, Dr. Utibe Essien. Research shows that patients with underlying medical conditions are at higher risk of contracting severe cases of Covid-19. While one in three Americans suffer from a metabolic disease, diabetes is 60% more prevalent in African Americans compared to White Americans, raising alarms about systemic issues plaguing black and brown communities. Here’s what six African American medical professionals are seeing on the frontline of the Covid-19 pandemic. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt What Covid-19 Disparities Mean To Black Doctors & Nurses
Living On $90K A Year In Metro Detroit | Millennial Money
Living On $90K A Year In Metro Detroit | Millennial Money
22 dagen geleden
Ron Navarro, 30, earns $90,000 a year as a registered nurse in the emergency department of DMC Detroit Receiving Hospital. In the first few weeks of the coronavirus outbreak, he worked 12-hour shifts, four-to-five days per week. Recently, though, he’s scaled back his time to his regular schedule of three days each week. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Ron's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/2SZ52zi As a registered nurse in the emergency department of DMC Detroit Receiving Hospital, Ron Navarro is on the frontlines of the pandemic in one of the hardest-hit regions in the country. He views it as his duty to care for the community no matter the circumstances, referencing the Florence Nightingale Pledge for nurses, which puts the welfare of the community before individuals. Navarro’s mother, Gertrudes, came to the United States from the Philippines in the 1970s, and she was a nurse at the same hospital where her son works. She retired in 2014. One of the big differences between their experiences, he says, is that his mother still receives a pension from the hospital, which the family puts toward their bills. Navarro will not receive that when he retires, as it’s no longer offered to hospital employees. But that doesn’t bother Navarro. It’s a blessing to be able to do what he loves while earning decent money. “I love nursing, taking care of people,” he says. “It’s an honor to be helping those in need.” » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $90K A Year In Metro Detroit | Millennial Money
What It's Like To Have Coronavirus
What It's Like To Have Coronavirus
28 dagen geleden
"Fever, dry cough, shortness of breath." These were the main symptoms to be aware of when the CDC initially released its findings of the novel Coronavirus. But as Covid-19 made its way around the world, healthcare workers and scientists noticed how different cases looked from person to person. While those with severe symptoms swept news coverage, the majority of confirmed cases have been mild or somewhere in between. As we continue to navigate questions of immunity, mass testing, and severity of symptoms, the best way to study the virus has been to talk to people in recovery to have a proper understanding of their experience of how they survived. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt What It's Like To Have Coronavirus
Update: Living On $280K A Year In Metro Detroit | Millennial Money
Update: Living On $280K A Year In Metro Detroit | Millennial Money
29 dagen geleden
Before the coronavirus pandemic, Alex Pardoe earned $280,000 a year as a hairdresser who co-owns his own salon. But when the salon had to close its doors in March, Pardoe lost most of his income as well. This is a special installment of Millennial Money, which profiles millennials across the U.S. and details how they manage their money. Read more about Alex here: cnb.cx/35G2JWP Closing his hair salon, Aesthetic Hair Co., in Detroit, Michigan, is the hardest thing 26-year-old Alex Pardoe has ever had to do. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, Pardoe and his co-owners had to shutter the salon on March 17, and temporarily let go of all of their employees so they could collect unemployment benefits. “Having to lay off my employees was one of the most difficult decisions that me and my business partners have ever had to make,” he tells CNBC Make It. “But in this particular climate, we had really no other option. There is no way for us to keep people on a payroll with nothing coming in.” Still, Pardoe knows closing was the right choice. Although it’s a stressful time for everyone, “it’s an important time for us to stay home and be as healthy as we possibly can,” Pardoe says. “With hairdressing, there is no way for us to maintain social distance. It was really important for us to close.” The salon received a loan through the Paycheck Protection Program during the second round of funding, which the co-owners plan to use to cover payroll costs once they are allowed to reopen. Currently, they are using the loan to cover other qualified costs, like rent and utilities, per guidelines set by the Small Business Administration. They plan to carefully follow the SBA’s guidelines for the loan in order to have it eventually forgiven. For Pardoe himself, closing the doors at Aesthetic has meant a significant loss in income. He previously earned around $280,000 a year, primarily from working with clients directly cutting hair, putting in extensions and doing color work. But as the pandemic continues, he’s self-isolating at home with his dog, Biscuit, unable to see clients in person. Pardoe still brings in some income from partial ownership in an investment property, his e-commerce line of hair products, online education and affiliate and sponsored opportunities through Instagram. He estimates that generates about $3,000 to $4,000 per month, which covers a large chunk of his expenses, and he also says he will receive about $350 per week in unemployment. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Update: Living On $280K A Year In Metro Detroit | Millennial Money
Suze Orman Reacts: Living On $80K A Year In L.A. | Millennial Money
Suze Orman Reacts: Living On $80K A Year In L.A. | Millennial Money
Maand geleden
Personal finance expert Suze Orman wants Wendy Gonzalez to think bigger when it comes to her money goals. The Los Angeles-based millennial earns $80,000 a year working as a logistics supervisor for an auto tech company and eventually wants to make $95,000. “Why limit yourself to $95,000 a year?” Orman asks, reacting to CNBC Make It’s Millennial Money episode that features Gonzalez. Orman also wishes the millennial hadn’t splurged on a BMW, which sets her back $720 a month. In addition to the car payment, Gonzalez spends about $90 on gas, putting her monthly transportation costs at $810. “What you deserve is a life of financial independence, not some car,” Orman says. There is good news: “She’s saving money, she’s working ... and she’s making coffee at home,” says Orman, who thinks that buying coffee is like “peeing $1 million down the drain.” Gonzalez sets aside about $1,000 a month. She saves in a Roth IRA, high-yield savings account and a brokerage account. Gonzalez has around $25,000 saved in a high-yield savings account, which she has earmarked for a down payment one day. Watch Orman’s full reaction to Gonzalez’s spending and savings habits. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Suze Orman Reacts: Living On $80K A Year In LA | Millennial Money
What It Takes To Run A Dog Grooming Business In NYC
What It Takes To Run A Dog Grooming Business In NYC
Maand geleden
Laura Jayne Massaro has dreamed of running her own business ever since she discovered her passion for dog grooming. After countless trainings and apprenticeships, she was finally able to open Hair of the Dog mobile grooming spa in 2015. Her unique, portable dog-spa-on-wheels allows her to serve a multitude of neighborhoods while also making it easier to cater to elderly and disabled clientele. It took her several years to grow her business to rise out of debt and build a steady following of fur-clients. Despite working with a lean staff and collecting a $72,000 annual salary, all of her plans for the future involve the expansion of her business to create a greater community of education and care taking services, which she actively involved in now as the global pandemic threatens small businesses everywhere. Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, Massaro has been helping other groomers to advocate for their services as essential businesses. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt What It Takes To Run A Dog Grooming Business In NYC
What It’s Like To Be A Landlord During Coronavirus | Millennial Money
What It’s Like To Be A Landlord During Coronavirus | Millennial Money
Maand geleden
In the wake of Covid-19, millions of people are facing economic hardship. Here’s how four millennial landlords across the U.S. adjusted to the economic changes, from Todd Baldwin outside Seattle, WA to Gabriela Ariza in Brookfield, IL. This is a special installment of Millennial Money, which profiles millennials across the U.S. and details how they manage their money. Read more here: cnb.cx/2VEZg7C Unemployment claims in the U.S. continue to climb due to the coronavirus pandemic, surpassing 26 million last week. Laid-off workers are struggling to make rent payments, and small landlords are already starting to feel the effect. CNBC Make It followed up with four Millennial Money subjects who own properties and rely on rental income to find out what it’s really like to be a landlord during this economic downturn. Here’s how they’ve been impacted by the crisis, what they’re doing to support their tenants and how they’ve shifted their strategy when it comes to investing in real estate. Seattle-based Todd Baldwin, 27, and his wife, Angela, 28, own six rental properties. They both make six-figures from their 9-to-5 jobs, which haven’t been affected by the pandemic. But their real estate revenue still represents a big chunk of their income: They bring in about $38,000 per month in rent. After expenses, including mortgage payments, taxes, insurance and utilities, they keep about $12,500 of that. Rather than renting out each house to a single tenant, they rent out each bedroom. In total, they have 34 tenants. “I know that some of them have been laid off or furloughed or lost hours,” Baldwin tells CNBC Make It. In April, the couple still received full payments from all of their tenants, but the Baldwins are preparing to work with them if they can’t make ends meet in the future. To keep spirits high, the couple made quarantine baskets for each tenant, filled with wine, snacks and a roll of toilet paper. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney What It’s Like To Be A Landlord During Coronavirus | Millennial Money
How Coronavirus Has Hurt This NYC Food Truck
How Coronavirus Has Hurt This NYC Food Truck
Maand geleden
Food truck co-owners Howard Jeon, Christopher Yu and Jeffrey Fann were set to expand their business and open a restaurant in Queens, NY in mid-March. In the week leading up to opening day, the coronavirus outbreak escalated in NYC, ultimately derailing their plans. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Coronavirus Has Hurt This NYC Food Truck
What It’s Like Being Unemployed Because Of Coronavirus
What It’s Like Being Unemployed Because Of Coronavirus
Maand geleden
The U.S. is currently grappling with unprecedented levels of unemployment and is predicted to experience a coronavirus-induced recession at least through 2021. As of April 17, over 22 million American workers have lost their jobs due to coronavirus. CNBC Make It spoke with some of these Americans to learn how they have been impacted professionally, financially and mentally. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt What It’s Like Being Unemployed Because Of Coronavirus
Recession Vs. Depression: What’s The Difference?
Recession Vs. Depression: What’s The Difference?
Maand geleden
Economists and journalists have been discussing the possibility of the U.S. entering a recession amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. Some have even gone as far as to say we could enter a depression. Here's a breakdown of the difference between a recession and a depression, and why we're likely in a recession, but not headed for a depression. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Recession Vs. Depression: What’s The Difference?
How Beats By Dre Became A Multi-Billion Dollar Brand
How Beats By Dre Became A Multi-Billion Dollar Brand
Maand geleden
Few brands have risen to the top of American pop culture as quickly as Beats by Dre. Beats was founded on a novel idea: use the principles of hype culture to sell headphones. That strategy turned over-the-ear-headphones from a niche product to a cultural phenomenon. Here’s how Beats by Dre leveraged the strategies of sneaker culture to become one of the most recognizable brands in the world. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Beats By Dre Became A Multi-Billion Dollar Brand
What It’s Like To Be A Working Drag Queen In NYC
What It’s Like To Be A Working Drag Queen In NYC
Maand geleden
David Brumfield, aka Lagoona Bloo, is a full-time drag queen in New York City. Before he discovered drag, David paid his bills as an actor, and supplemented his income as a waiter and a nanny. Before Covid-19, Lagoona was a steady host and headliner at some of NYC's top gay bars. Lagoona is eager to get back to the nightlife scene. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt What It’s Like To Be A Working Drag Queen In NYC
Living On $118K A Year In Philadelphia | Millennial Money
Living On $118K A Year In Philadelphia | Millennial Money
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Roy Patterson, 31, lives in Philadelphia and earns a base salary of $118,000 per year managing a team of project managers at Cigna. Patterson was able to pay off over $55,000 in student loans just before his 30th birthday. Now that he’s paid off all of his debt, Patterson is focused on saving for the future. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Roy's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/2RsquMi There was no silver bullet to pay off the loans, which his parents co-signed, he says. Instead, he lived ultra-frugally, throwing every extra dollar toward the debt each month. While he will earn close to $150,000 this year, he paid off his debt while earning between $61,000 to $90,000 per year. He was inspired by personal finance expert Suze Orman, and “The Suze Orman Show” became appointment television each week for him and his mother when he was still living with his parents in Connecticut. Mother and son followed Orman’s advice together, holding each other accountable to pay off debt - credit card and car bills for his mom, student loans for Patterson - and get the rest of their finances in order. While his parents provided a stable home for him and his siblings growing up, Patterson says, as immigrants from Jamaica they didn’t understand the nuances of the American financial system. Watching Orman’s show taught them how money works in the U.S. “I told my mom, If you do it, I’m going to do it. And we made this pact,” he says. “We would share our wins, we would share our successes. If we failed at something or we felt like we could do better, we shared that as well.” Using advice from Orman and Patterson’s own internet research, he decided to use the snowball method of debt repayment: He paid off the loan with the lowest balance first, and then moved on to the next largest loan, and so on, until all seven federal loans and five private loans were paid off. He credits part of his success to Orman’s no-nonsense attitude and advice, adding his reverence has become something of an inside joke. “My friends call me Mr. Orman,” he says with a laugh. He doesn’t regret the years of cost-cutting now that he’s debt free, although he occasionally wishes he hadn’t made quite so many sacrifices. He skipped a family trip to Jamaica because he didn’t want to buy a plane ticket, and he doesn’t want to miss out on experiences like that any more. Some things, like vacations with his loved ones and, of course, the P50, are worth the expense. “I worked with my mom, and the joy that she has in her life now, knowing that she’s also debt free, makes me realize that what we did works,” he says. “It allows us to live the life that we wanted to live.” » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $118K A Year In Philadelphia | Millennial Money
Teachers Offer Homeschooling Advice During Coronavirus
Teachers Offer Homeschooling Advice During Coronavirus
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Being a parent during the Coronavirus quarantines has taken on a whole new meaning. With 124,000 schools closed across the United States, more than 55 million students have been impacted. Parents are now balancing working from home with the added responsibility of homeschooling their children. Here is some advice from teachers for parents who are now homeschooling their kids. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Teachers Offer Homeschooling Advice During Coronavirus
How Coronavirus Delayed This Boxer’s Olympic Dreams
How Coronavirus Delayed This Boxer’s Olympic Dreams
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Bruce Carrington from Brownsville, Brooklyn, won the U.S. Olympic boxing trials and had his sights set on the 2020 games in Tokyo before the coronavirus pandemic delayed the games to 2021. He's already had many challenges to overcome. Brownsville is one of the deadliest neighborhoods in New York City and his brother was shot in a "seemingly random murder" in 2014 while walking down the street. The loss hit him hard, hurting his ability to focus on boxing and school. After losing the 2015 Golden Glove finals he decided to train even harder. He competed at the national level and was an alternate for the 2016 Olympic team. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Coronavirus Delayed This Boxer’s Olympic Dreams
Living On $56K In Dallas Before Coronavirus Unemployment | Millennial Money
Living On $56K In Dallas Before Coronavirus Unemployment | Millennial Money
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In January, Marek and Kothney-Issa Bush, both 28, earned a combined income of $56,000 and had settled into life in a tiny home community in Lake Dallas, Texas. The couple started the year completely debt-free, having paid off the last of their $125,000 debt in 2019. By March, the coronavirus pandemic resulted in Kothney-Issa losing both of her jobs while the national retailer where Marek worked as a theft and fraud investigator shuttered all of its locations. He’ll get paid for the next two weeks, but after that, he doesn’t know. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Marek and Kothney-Issa's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/3dRwGHl Check out their NLmind channel Living Tiny with the Bushes: nlmind.info/CXP69pn8qngsiF-g8MznOvw The Bushes estimate that they’ve lost about half of their monthly income so far, due to the effects of the pandemic. At the start of the year, Marek earned a $36,000 salary for his full-time job. Kothney-Issa worked as a server at a local restaurant, and she was on track to bring in around $20,000 a year. She also tutored on the side and was preparing to get certified to teach in Texas, where the couple moved in October 2019 after living in Florida for several years. Before the pandemic, the couple enjoyed having some wiggle room in their budget after spending two years cutting every possible expense and working multiple jobs to pay off $125,000 worth of debt. They were still careful with their money, buying clothes at Ross and hitting up happy hour. But the Bushes were able to put around $600 per month toward discretionary spending like dining out. Losing their jobs forced the Bushes to cut their spending dramatically. They dropped their budget for discretionary spending from $600 to $150 (“If that,” Kothney-Issa says), eliminated all spending on unexpected expenses, canceled their gym membership and are temporarily taking a break from saving. They were also able to put a pause on the insurance for one of their cars, so they’re only driving one for now. Donating to their church and supporting Kothney-Issa’s sister is a top priority for the couple, so they’re keeping it in the budget for now. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $56K In Dallas During Coronavirus Unemployment | Millennial Money
How Flamin’ Hot Cheetos Became America’s Favorite Snack
How Flamin’ Hot Cheetos Became America’s Favorite Snack
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It seems like you can’t go anywhere without seeing Flamin’ Hot Cheetos. Since launching Flamin' Hot Cheetos in 1992, Frito-Lay is continuing to expand their Flamin’ Hot product line. There are 15 Flamin' Hot snacks from popcorn to Doritos. It's easy to mistake Flamin' Hot’s popularity as just another social media trend. But experts say, its success is actually a reflection of America's shifting demographics and their desire for more intense flavors. Here’s how Flamin’ Hot went from a janitor’s vision to a world-wide phenomenon. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Flamin’ Hot Cheetos Became America’s Favorite Snack
How This Bartender Is Making Ends Meet During The Coronavirus Pandemic
How This Bartender Is Making Ends Meet During The Coronavirus Pandemic
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Chris Scensny was making $1,200 a week in upstate New York as a bartender. Once the coronavirus forced him out, he posted on Facebook asking for $6 in exchange for teaching people how to make their own drinks at home. His post went viral and he says he made about $1,500 in 3 days. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How This Bartender Is Making Ends Meet During The Coronavirus Pandemic
How Coronavirus Changed College Overnight
How Coronavirus Changed College Overnight
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Colleges and universities around the world have closed their campuses and moved to online classes as a result of COVID-19. As of March 24, 2020, 1,102 colleges and universities have closed their campuses due to coronavirus, impacting over 14 million students. From canceled commencement ceremonies to job market uncertainty, here's how these closures have affected students and professors across the United States. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #StayHome How Coronavirus Changed College Overnight
How Hand Sanitizer Sales Spike During Pandemics
How Hand Sanitizer Sales Spike During Pandemics
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Since COVID-19 hit the U.S., people have been stockpiling hand sanitizer, causing sales to increase 470% in the first week of March 2020. Hand sanitizer is now a $200 million industry, and with the public’s growing awareness about the importance of hygiene to combat viral outbreaks like COVID-19, there’s no foreseeable limit to that demand. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #StayHome How Hand Sanitizer Sales Spike During Pandemics
Living On $210K A Year In NYC | Millennial Money
Living On $210K A Year In NYC | Millennial Money
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Bukola Ayodele, 25, earns $210,000 a year as a software engineer in New York City. That income includes her base salary, bonus and equity. She doesn’t touch the equity and lives off of her base salary and bonus. Now, she wants to inspire more women, and especially black women, to join her in tech. Ayodele attributes that low percentage, partly, to being unaware of the opportunities available. To help fill the gap, she started a NLmind channel called The Come Up to provide black women and other women of color with the resources and advice she wished existed when she first considered pursuing a career in tech. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Bukola's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/33ckNql She attended Columbia University where she studied political science. She graduated in 2016 with $7,000 in student loan debt, thanks to combination of needs-based financial aid and holding a job throughout college, as well as financial support from her grandmother and her parents, who also took out some loans. She paid off her loans by the beginning of 2018. Growing up, “we had a saying that you could either be a doctor or a lawyer or a disgrace,” she says, and after college, she expected to go into law. But it didn’t take her long to realize she wasn’t passionate about the work. Computer science, though, had appealed to her since she took an introductory course in undergrad. After researching careers online, Ayodele quit her job in compliance in 2017 to attend a three-month engineering retreat at the New York City-based RECURSE Center to refresh her programming skills. Leaving behind a steady job is never an easy call, especially when you’re living paycheck to paycheck, like Ayodele was. While the retreat itself was free, she saved around $6,000 in the months before she quit her job. Making that career change is what inspired her to start taking her finances more seriously: She watched NLmind videos, listened to podcasts and cut her expenses down as far as she could to save up. Ayodele is a fan of the FIRE - financial independence, retire early - movement, and one of her goals is to earn enough off of her investments that all of her monthly costs are covered. To that end, she contributes $1,583 each month to max out her 401(k) contributions for the year (those were her contributions in 2019 when this story was reported; the 2020 individual contribution limit increased slightly from $19,000 to $19,500), and invests an additional $4,000 a month in a Vanguard brokerage account. She also contributes around $42 a month to a health savings account. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $210K A Year In Brooklyn | Millennial Money
Why You Spend So Much Money At Trader Joe's
Why You Spend So Much Money At Trader Joe's
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Trader Joe's bucks much of the general wisdom of typical grocery stores in the U.S. - it doesn't do sales or coupons, has no self-checkout, no loyalty cards, and almost always has a nightmare-ish line at check-out. Here's how it was successful anyway. A trip to Trader Joe's is an odyssey, with struggles, discovery and the spoils of victory: Its parking lots are notorious ("If you didn't have a near death experience in a parking lot, did you even go to Trader Joe's?" tweeted a customer), as are the long checkout lines that wind through the store's crowded aisles. And you won't find sales, coupons or loyalty cards. But Trader Joe's shoppers inevitably leave with an exciting new snack addiction and a respectable bottle of wine for under $5. That odyssey, the emotional journey, is part of what has inspired consumers' obsession with Trader Joe's. There are unofficial Instagram accounts dedicated to the brand (@traderjoeslist has 1.1 million followers alone). Even celebrities crave Trader Joe's; Hillary Duff, for example, is "obsessed" with the egg-white salad. And when Trader Joe's opened it's store in Germantown outside of Memphis in Tennessee, more than 500 people reportedly waited in line. Fandom translates to sales. In 2019, Trader Joe's 505 U.S. stores had an estimated $13.7 billion in net sales, according to retail insights company Edge by Ascential. For comparison, Whole Foods had $16.5 billion U.S. net sales in 2019 (in-store sales only, Whole Foods groceries sold on Amazon.com not included), while Costco had $110.5 billion in store-based (Costco.com sales are tracked separately) net sales, according to Edge by Ascential. Bringing in billions from a cult of customers is no accident. But the brand has carefully pruned its business strategy to inspire evangelism from its customers. Here are some of the ways Trader Joe's gets people hooked. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #TraderJoes Why You Spend So Much Money At Trader Joe's
Millennial Millionaire Graham Stephan On Watches & Credit Cards
Millennial Millionaire Graham Stephan On Watches & Credit Cards
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Graham Stephan, 29, lives in Los Angeles, CA and earns $1.6 million a year as a real estate agent and a NLmindr. Here's a look at why Graham views watches as an investment and what credit cards he keeps in his wallet. This is a bonus installment of CNBC Make It's Millennial Money series, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn, spend and save their money. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Millennial Millionaire Graham Stephan On Watches & Credit Cards
Buying A $140K Condo In Austin, Texas | Millennial Mortgage
Buying A $140K Condo In Austin, Texas | Millennial Mortgage
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Bryce Dishongh, 37, purchased a 600 square-foot condo in Austin, Texas for $140,000, with a down payment of just $6,000, or about 4.2%. “The primary reason I wanted to buy a condo is because rent fluctuates,” he tells CNBC Make It. “I wanted to stay at the same rate for the foreseeable future.” This is the latest installment of Millennial Mortgage, which profiles first-time buyers across the U.S. and details how they purchased their homes. Read more about Bryce's home buying process here: Dishongh earns just over $100,000 a year between his full-time job as a senior front-end developer and his multiple side gigs, which include his pet portrait business and working part-time at a doggy day care. He’s lived in Austin for about 17 years, and has no plans to leave: He’s built a community of friends here, is close to family and loves that the city is constantly changing. “It’s my comfort zone, but it keeps growing,” he says. “I can go and experience new things on a daily basis.” But unlike many homeowners, Dishongh didn’t dream of owning his own place or spend years saving up for a down payment. He simply realized that it made more financial sense for him to take on a fixed mortgage payment, rather than watch his rent continue to escalate. One day, he called up a realtor friend and immediately started looking at places. At the time, Dishongh was paying $1,200 a month to rent an apartment and wanted a place that would cost around the same, including extras like property taxes and homeowners association fees, but stay consistent over time. He had enough in savings that he could comfortably cover a small down payment. He looked at about 10 homes in Austin, but “what I was seeing was a lot of overpriced, investor-bought places that they were trying to flip, and I didn’t want to be that sucker,” he says. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Buying A $140K Condo In Austin, Texas | Millennial Mortgage
Living On $615K A Year In Seattle | Millennial Millionaire
Living On $615K A Year In Seattle | Millennial Millionaire
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Todd Baldwin is a 27-year-old who lives just outside Seattle, WA and brings in $615,000 a year. His day job is in commercial health insurance and earns him $150,000 per year before commission. He owns 6 rental properties with his wife Angela that net $12,500 per month. Here's where his money philosophy comes from and how he chooses to spend, or not spend it. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Todd's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/38dNlRn Todd Baldwin has always wanted to make a lot of money. “I was raised by a single mom, and I watched her struggle working four jobs to try to feed three kids,” the 27-year-old self-made millionaire tells CNBC Make It. “She was worried all the time about money. I saw it. I could feel it.” Baldwin didn’t want to experience the same financial stress when he grew up, so at 12, he started working. His first job was shoveling manure for $3 an hour: “I came home one day, and I counted up six dollars worth of quarters. At the time, it was more money than I had ever seen. Since that moment I was like, I’ve got to make millions of dollars.” He achieved that goal at 25 when his net worth crossed $1 million, thanks to smart real estate investing with his wife, Angela. Today, he brings in $615,000 annually thanks to a mix of income from rental properties, his day job working in commercial insurance sales and the extra cash he makes as a secret shopper. After real estate expenses, his take-home pay is closer to $305,000. Angela brings in another six figures from her 9-to-5, a paycheck they almost entirely save. The Baldwins live “very comfortably,” he says. But he still has lofty money goals: By 35, he wants his net worth to hit $10 million. After dropping out of Western Washington University in 2014, Baldwin landed a sales job in the commercial insurance industry. His starting salary was $50,000, but after several high-performing months, he doubled it to $100,000 in less than a year. Today, his salary from his day job is $150,000. The bulk of Baldwin’s revenue, though, comes from real estate. He and his wife own six rental properties worth over $4 million and bring in about $460,000 per year in rent, or $38,300 per month. After expenses, including mortgage payments, taxes, insurance and utilities, they keep about $150,000 of that per year, or $12,500 a month. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $615K A Year In Seattle | Millennial Millionaire
How Kombucha Became A $500 Million Opportunity
How Kombucha Became A $500 Million Opportunity
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It seems like kombucha, the fizzy fermented tea known for its probiotic properties, is having a moment: The U.S. market for the drink went from $152 million dollars in 2015 to $492 million dollars in 2019, according to research from Nielsen. Here's how kombucha went from a niche farmers' market beverage to a global phenomenon. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Kombucha How Kombucha Became A $500 Million Opportunity
Why It’s Cheaper To Have A Baby In Finland Than The U.S.
Why It’s Cheaper To Have A Baby In Finland Than The U.S.
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As 2019′s happiest country in the world, Finland is undoubtedly a great place to have children. With lengthy parental leave, hundreds of dollars worth of free baby products in the signature baby box and low-to-no childbirth costs, here’s why it’s better to have a baby in Finland than in the U.S. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Finland Why It’s Cheaper To Have A Baby In Finland Than The U.S.
Living Together On $124K A Year In Portland, Oregon | Millennial Money
Living Together On $124K A Year In Portland, Oregon | Millennial Money
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Marissa and Jacob Lyda earn a combined income of $124,000 and live in Portland, Oregon. Here's how they split finances as a couple and purchased a home after tackling nearly $90,000 worth of student debt. Read more about Marissa and Jacob's budget breakdown: cnb.cx/2Hp3dFi The couple, who met at Corban University in Salem, Oregon, and got married in July 2015, paid off all of their student debt in two and a half years, mostly thanks to their living situation. They still paid Marissa’s mom some rent - $200 a month - “but it allowed us to dump almost all of our income, after paying insurance and paying all of our other expenses, to debt,” says Jacob. After becoming debt-free in 2017, they celebrated with a Caribbean cruise and moved into their own apartment, but their lifestyle didn’t change much. That made it easy to save for a home, adds Jacob: “We were already in a very frugal mindset because we had come off of paying down so much debt.” Rather than upgrading their lifestyle, they redirected the money that previously went toward their loans into a house fund. In the fall of 2019, after saving a little over $20,000 for the down payment, the couple closed on a $428,000, four-bed, three-bath house in Portland, Oregon. Today, with a baby on the way, they have shifted their financial priorities with a goal of saving a $25,000 emergency fund. Marissa earns $45,000 a year working as an accounting manager for a non-profit. She works four, 10-hour days - Monday through Thursday - and spends the bulk of Fridays working on her side business, The Budgeting Wife, which has evolved from a blog she started to document the process of paying off student loans into a personal finance brand. It took a year and a half to start monetizing her platforms, but today she has more than 33,000 subscribers on NLmind and makes about $27,500 a year between The Budgeting Wife and freelance video editing projects. Her business expenses run low: $400 per month. She spends $200 on monthly subscriptions and equipment, and puts $200 toward a business savings account for any big, future purchases she wants to make for her company. Jacob works in product marketing for a software company and makes $51,500, putting their combined total income at $124,000. They live comfortably, but earning more is “always something to work toward,” says Jacob. “It would be nice, especially since we have one child on the way, and if we decide to have more children.” » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living Together On $124K A Year In Portland, Oregon | Millennial Money
Why White Truffles Cost Up To $75K Per Pound
Why White Truffles Cost Up To $75K Per Pound
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There is something undeniably intoxicating about the smell of truffles. In fact, that potent smell is a major part of why truffles are so expensive. In 2019, someone paid over $130,000 for just over two pounds of white truffles. Interestingly enough, there's a scientific explanation behind the intense reactions to the scent. “One of the important things to remember with truffles, actually, is because they grow below ground and because of their life-cycle, they need to be eaten so they say they want to entice us,” says truffle scientist Dr. Paul Thomas. Thomas says that consuming truffles, especially white truffles, gives the same physically intoxicating effects as cannabis, though to a lesser degree. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #WorthTheMoney #SoExpensive Why White Truffles Cost Up To $75K Per Pound
Living On $120K A Year In The D.C. Area | Millennial Money
Living On $120K A Year In The D.C. Area | Millennial Money
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Garrett Ramela, a 24-year-old former Marine, earns $120,000 a year as a defense contractor in the Washington, D.C. area. He owns three properties that bring in nearly $40,000 a year in rental income, but nets far less since this income pays off mortgages on the properties. Here's how Garrett makes and spends his money. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Garrett's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/37MEt5O Sitting on his new West Elm bed in his two-bedroom condo in National Harbor, Maryland, 24-year-old Garrett Ramela flashes bill after colorful bill: bright red from Singapore, pale purple from England, teal and brown from Sudan. He started the collection during his years in the Marine Corps, when he spent time stationed across three different continents and traveled to more than a dozen countries. In a nearby box, a collection of coins and medals shine in the mid-morning sun. Ramela’s collection of foreign currency symbolizes more than just his past. Money is part of what motivates him to work so hard, pursue multiple graduate degrees and invest in real estate. He’s working toward a future where he can enjoy a comfortable lifestyle and the flexibility to travel or live anywhere in the world. Today, he’s employed full-time at a tech company as a defense contractor (where he earns a base salary of $120,000). He owns three properties (which bring in another $38,000 a year in rental income). And he’s meticulous in his day-to-day financial decision making, which is reflected in his carefully curated budgeting spreadsheet. “I joined the Marine Corps because I graduated high school and fell on my face,” he admits. Balancing online college courses with a string of odd jobs left Ramela both overwhelmed and directionless. The military not only provided structure but offered him tuition benefits and the ability to travel, so in 2013, he enlisted. He went to boot camp in 2014 and was stationed in Virginia Beach, Virginia. From there, he volunteered for an assignment in Okinawa, Japan, and later another deployment in Djibouti, Africa, where he spent a year before returning to Japan. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $120K A Year In The D.C. Area | Millennial Money
How StockX Built A Billion Dollar Sneaker Resale Empire
How StockX Built A Billion Dollar Sneaker Resale Empire
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StockX is an online marketplace for luxury sneakers, handbags and apparel like Retro Jordans, a Hermes Birkin Himalayan crocodile bag in matte, or a Rolex Oyster Perpetual watch. You can even find extremely rare Pokemon cards like a Charizard-Holo 1999 base set 1st edition. In November 2018, StockX sold its most expensive item ever: a 70,000-dollar Louis Vuitton x Supreme Malle Courier Trunk. By June of 2019, the Detroit-based company reportedly reached a $1 billion valuation. In half a decade, StockX went from a simple price guide for sneakers to a reselling empire and it has its sights on disrupting the retail market. Before co-founding StockX, Josh Luber ran three tech startups and joined the corporate world as a consultant at IBM in 2010. Luber was a sneaker head, but “almost intentionally avoided creating any businesses that had to do anything with sneakers.” While researching data at IBM, Luber realized eBay was the biggest marketplace for sneaker reselling, but with multiple sellers listing different prices for the same product. Luber figured that the sneaker reselling market would benefit from following an exchange model. This system would help alleviate uncertainty and mean that every sneaker listed on the exchange has one true market value. In 2012, Luber started a side project called Campless, which scraped data from eBay resellers to look at prices for all sneakers sold on the platform via auction. This essentially created a shoe reselling price guide for sneakerheads. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How StockX Built A Billion Dollar Sneaker Resale Empire
Living On $80K A Year In Los Angeles | Millennial Money
Living On $80K A Year In Los Angeles | Millennial Money
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Wendy Gonzalez, 24, earns around $80,000 a year and lives in the Los Angeles area. She makes her money as a logistics supervisor for an auto tech company and saves a minimum of $1,000 a month. Wendy is saving for a home, has set her sight on business school and plans to grow and monetize her NLmind channel to help pay for the MBA. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Wendy’s budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/2teWCKv She's well on her way to getting there, with over 1,000 NLmind subscribers and $25,000 earmarked specifically for a down payment. "I've been saving since I was 15," Gonzalez tells CNBC Make It. That's when she got her first job, working at Cold Stone Creamery. "Being raised by immigrant parents, I was always told, you need to save every penny. And so I've always had that mentality - that you should strive to save for the future." Gonzalez, who lives with her boyfriend, Chris, in Pasadena, California, about 11 miles northeast of downtown Los Angeles, knows better than anybody that the future is unpredictable: In August 2019, she was diagnosed with thyroid cancer. After a successful surgery in October, she's now cancer-free. "I've realized that health is one of the biggest priorities that we should put first in our life," she says. She also experienced first-hand the importance of having an emergency fund. Her health insurance plan covered the entire cost of her surgery, but her savings account allowed her to feel financially secure during a trying time. "If I didn't have a good health plan, I did have enough savings that could have covered my surgery," and that feels good, she says. "I've learned that, one: You should always take care of your health. And, when you're healthy, you should always strive to have some type of savings for a rainy day." Gonzalez makes $80,000 a year working as a logistics supervisor for an auto tech company. She started as a part-time employee while finishing her last year at UCLA. "I feel that I live comfortably with $80,000 in LA, especially because I am splitting costs with my boyfriend, but there's always room for more growth and higher pay," she says. "My goal is to make roughly $95,000 a year." Besides her 9-to-5 job, she earns an additional $500 to $700 a month as an online ESL teacher. Gonzalez wakes up at 3:30 a.m. to teach for two hours before heading into the office for her full-time gig. The extra money goes straight to savings. "I don't count that as part of my yearly salary," she says. "I just look at it as money to invest and save." She also has a NLmind channel called Invested Millennial, which she uses to share her experience investing in the stock market: "I don't see a lot of women on NLmind talking about investing - a lot of them are focusing on budgeting and saving, which is amazing, but I think we need more women talking about the power of investing." » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $80K A Year In Los Angeles | Millennial Money
What It's Like To Be LA's Top Real Estate Agent
What It's Like To Be LA's Top Real Estate Agent
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Aaron Kirman knows how to close a deal: He’s sold about $6 billion worth of real estate over his 25-year career, making him the No. 1 agent in Los Angeles and among the top in the country. As a top realtor, Kirman makes seven figures, but not all real estate agents earn a ton of money - and that's one of the biggest misconceptions of the job. Most bring home less than $50,000 a year, he estimates, while a top producer will make between $200,000 and $500,000. "Then you have the very, very, very top - a select few who make more than a million," he says, adding: "And then there's one level up, which is big, mega brokers. I'm pretty lucky to consider myself one of those." To experience a sliver of what it's like to be the top realtor in the City of Angels, I spent a day with Aaron, meeting clients and looking at listings in some of the wealthiest neighborhoods in LA. He routinely sells multi-million dollar properties, including one estate for a whopping $65 million, and on his new CNBC show, “Listing Impossible,” he helps stubborn homeowners sell their luxury real estate. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #ListingImpossible What It's Like To Be LA's Top Real Estate Agent
Why Finland And Denmark Are Happier Than The U.S.
Why Finland And Denmark Are Happier Than The U.S.
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What does it take to be happy? The Nordic countries seem to have it all figured out. Finland and Denmark have consistently topped the United Nations’ most prestigious index, The World Happiness Report, in all six areas of life satisfaction: income, healthy life expectancy, social support, freedom, trust and generosity. Learn more about work-life balance secrets from the happiest countries in the world on CNBC Make It: cnb.cx/37So3YY Each year, a group of happiness experts from around the globe rank 156 countries based on how “happy” citizens are, and they publish their findings in the World Happiness Report. Happiness might seem like an elusive concept to quantify, but there is a science to it. When researchers talk about “happiness,” they’re referring to “satisfaction with the way one’s life is going,” Jeff Sachs, co-creator of the World Happiness Report and a professor at Columbia University, tells CNBC Make It. “It’s not primarily a measure of whether one laughed or smiled yesterday, but how one feels about the course of one’s life,” he says. Since the report began in 2012, Nordic countries - which include Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Iceland, plus the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Aland - consistently turn up at the top of the list. (The United States, on the other hand, typically lands somewhere around 18th or 19th place.) » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBCMakeIt #Denmark #Finland Are Nordic People Really That Happy?
How Haben Girma Became Harvard Law School’s First Deafblind Grad
How Haben Girma Became Harvard Law School’s First Deafblind Grad
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Haben Girma was born without hearing or vision, but refuses to be hindered by her ability status-she dances, practices comedy, surfs, skis, and frequently travels the world. In 2013, she became the first and only deafblind student to graduate from Harvard Law and went on to become an attorney. After conceptualizing her own method of communication, Haben also began advocating for equal accessibility in tech developments. Though it’s common for people to marvel at her accomplishments, she is adamant about not being called “inspirational,” but rather to let that feeling drive action and change. Note: This video has been created for the visually impaired. A version without visual narrations can be found here: nlmind.info/video/v4ySiYKOq5mVrtI.html » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Haben Girma Became Harvard Law School’s First Deafblind Grad
Is Expensive Coffee Worth The Money?
Is Expensive Coffee Worth The Money?
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Personal finance experts like Ramit Sethi and Suze Orman are split on whether buying coffee is a waste of money, but what about paying $100 for a cup? Elida Geisha Natural 1029 is currently the most expensive coffee in the world at $1,029 per pound. Is it worth the money? » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Is Expensive Coffee Worth The Money?
Living On $110K A Year In Brooklyn | Millennial Money
Living On $110K A Year In Brooklyn | Millennial Money
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Jesus Campos, 24, earns around $110,000 a year and lives in Brooklyn, New York with his wife and two children. He supplements his income as a utility company supervisor by bringing in tens of thousands of dollars on the side reselling items on Amazon. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Jesus' budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/2S6SbLx After dropping out of high school his senior year, Campos got his GED at 19 and started working for the utility company in 2017. This year, he'll earn around $80,000 pretax from his full-time job - he is an hourly employee, eligible for overtime - and supplements that income by bringing in tens of thousands of dollars on the side reselling things on Amazon. Tax records show over $71,000 in Amazon transactions in 2018; Campos took home just over $20,000 of that, pretax. So far this year, he's sold over $80,000 worth of merchandise (he says he expects to top $100,000 by the end of December), banking him around $30,000 pretax. Credit card statements show the mix of retailers he routinely scours for products to resell, including BJ's, Staples, Target and Walmart. The amount he sells varies widely by the month. He sold over $19,000 worth of product last December, while November 2018 saw just north of $7,000. He spends around 10 to 15 hours per week shopping, packing and shipping. At first, Campos kept the products in the apartment he shares with his wife, two children and his wife's family. But the eight occupants were already squeezed for space in the 800-square-foot home; piles of unopened electronics and baby toys took up valuable real estate the family needed to live their lives day to day. Now Campos pays $201 per month to rent a storage unit nearby. He drops off the merchandise at the unit after store runs, where he and his wife also sort, package and prep the products to mail to Amazon. Campos started reselling on Amazon in 2018, and plans to keep ratcheting up his sales volume each year. He hopes that will give him enough money by the time he turns 28 to start buying rental properties and earn more income. He wants to expand his business to build a family empire. "That's my dream goal," he says. "And from there, give my businesses to my children, and my children's children, as legacies." You could say that an entrepreneurial spirit runs in Jesus Campos' family. The 24-year-old grew up in Brooklyn, NY, working in his grandparents' bakery. As so many of the mom-and-pop shops across New York City's five boroughs get eaten up by national chains and families get priced out of the neighborhoods they've called home for generations, the Campos family has held firm in Williamsburg, with La Guadalupana Bakery as their anchor. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $110K A Year In Brooklyn | Millennial Money
Buying A $599K Townhouse In Los Angeles | Millennial Mortgage
Buying A $599K Townhouse In Los Angeles | Millennial Mortgage
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Jenelle Yee and Ver Starr, both 28, put $60,000 down on their $599,000 townhouse. They currently pay $3,850 per month, which includes a $2,663 mortgage payment and nearly $700 in property taxes. That's more than what they were paying in rent, but it's worth it, says Starr: "We're building our equity in something that we own." Plus, it's an upgrade from their previous 2-bedroom apartment and a space where they plan to live when they start a family. This is the latest installment of Millennial Mortgage, which profiles first-time buyers across the U.S. and details how they purchased their homes. Read more about Jenelle and Ver’s home buying process here: cnb.cx/2YN5sKD Two years ago, Ver Starr decided to calculate how much rent he and his fiancee, Jenelle Yee, had paid over the past four years they lived together. "It was upwards of six figures," he tells CNBC Make It. "And that just didn't sit easy with me." That's when the Los Angeles-based couple, now 28, started saving money specifically for a down payment. They already were setting aside a significant portion of their income: Starr, a software engineer, was contributing 25% of his paycheck to retirement accounts, while Yee, a product manager, was putting about 90% of her income in high-yield savings accounts, retirement accounts and index funds. She already had $70,000 in savings that she'd been building up since she started working at age 13. Starr, who is still paying off student loans, didn't start saving so aggressively until three years ago, when the couple moved from Austin to LA and they saw their rent increase. When they decided to buy a home, he didn't have much savings outside of his retirement accounts, so he found ways to cut back in order to contribute more to their down payment. He started small, by breaking his Starbucks habit: "I don't buy a $5.25 grande cappuccino anymore. I make my own cold brew for like $0.20." He also stopped spending money on material items like video games and clothes. As a couple, they cut cable, stopped eating out, reduced their car insurance premiums by going for the higher deductible and even sold items they didn't need anymore, like furniture and computer parts. By the time they were ready to buy, two years later, they decided to put $60,000 down on a $599,000, 3-bed, 2.5-bath townhome in Gardena, California, 12 miles south of LA. The majority of the down payment, $45,000, came from Yee's savings, while $15,000 came from Starr's. They could have put more down, but didn't want to tap into their emergency fund or long-term investments. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney #MillennialMortgage Buying A $599K Townhouse In Los Angeles | Millennial Mortgage
Does "Sustainable Clothing" From Brands Like Nike Make A Difference?
Does "Sustainable Clothing" From Brands Like Nike Make A Difference?
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Billions of water bottles are recycled and turned into polyester each year. Patagonia pioneered this process in 1993, which has since gained widespread popularity with other brands. Customers now have more environmentally-friendly options when it comes to new purchases, but are there other hidden costs to the environment? » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Does "Sustainable Clothing" From Brands Like Nike Make A Difference?
Living On $45K A Year In Washington, D.C. | Millennial Money
Living On $45K A Year In Washington, D.C. | Millennial Money
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Victor Yang, 26, earns $45,000 a year and lives in Washington, D.C. As a congressional staffer with over three years experience Yang typically works more than 40 hours a week and sometimes ends up staying at the office until 9 or 10 p.m. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Victor's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/2YkMbQt Victor Yang can still vividly picture the sign his parents hung above his bedroom door growing up: "Time management is the key to success." The sign was a way of life for the Yang family. The mindset helped his parents, who immigrated from China in their 30s, to push through the hardships they faced building a life in the United States. And they passed the mantra on to Yang, he tells CNBC Make It. For Yang, that philosophy plays a large part in how he handles the money he earns working as a congressional aid in Washington D.C. "You spend when you need to spend money on something. But when you don't, then step back and think to yourself, Do I really need to make this purchase?" he says. Most of the time, Yang answers 'no.' No to hailing an Uber when he can ride his bike. No to eating out when he can cook at home. No to a gym membership when the city provides complimentary facilities. Why would he pay for something when there's a free solution at his fingertips? "I'm a big proponent of public service," he says. "I believe it's important to give back to the country that you love." Additionally, he's passionate about seeing more Asian-American representation in politics and government. Yang's salary has risen nominally every year that he's been on Capitol Hill, but his pay is largely determined by a number of political factors that don't have anything directly to do with him or the office he works for. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $45K A Year In Washington, DC | Millennial Money
How White Claw Took Over The $1 Billion Hard Seltzer Industry
How White Claw Took Over The $1 Billion Hard Seltzer Industry
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If 2019 was the unofficial summer of hard seltzer, no brand made a bigger splash than White Claw. Sales of the brand were up 250% since it was introduced in 2016 and White Claw is the #1 brand fronting a $1 billion industry. White Claw isn’t just seltzer with a spirit like vodka added to it. It’s actually brewed like beer. It’s made with a mixture of gluten-free grains and sugars. That mixture is fermented into alcohol, which is then purified to remove odors, colors and tastes. It then mixes that base with water and other flavors, which keeps the alcohol percentage lower than that of a spirit or wine drink. But White Claw is just one of many brands enjoying the recent growth in demand for hard seltzer. Part of the reason for their popularity is simple: hard seltzers are comparable to beer in terms of alcohol percentage but tend to have fewer calories and carbs. This proves to be a strong selling point, with hard seltzer brands becoming very good at pushing that message to the masses. Hard seltzer holds 3.4% of the total share of the beer, flavored malt beverages and cider market, but the dramatic increase in popularity hasn’t gone unnoticed. Big beer has entered the playing field. Anheuser-Busch (AB INBEV), the big beer giant behind Bud Light and Natural Light, acquired what’s now known as Bon + Viv from Nick Shields, the so-called founding father of spiked seltzer, in 2016. In August 2019 they introduced Natural Light Seltzer to their portfolio and sold about 480,000 12-packs in three months. White Claw’s biggest competitor is Boston Beer Company’s Truly,which grew sales 177% in 2019. The company says Truly is now larger than established beer brands like Stella Artois and Blue Moon. But what does the added competition mean for White Claw? » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #WhiteClaw How White Claw Took Over The $1 Billion Hard Seltzer Industry
How Hygge Took Over America
How Hygge Took Over America
6 maanden geleden
Hygge is the Danish concept of relaxation and coziness. You've probably experienced hygge without knowing it. When you curl up in your sweats, light a candle, put on water for tea, grab a good book, you've got the perfect recipe for a hyggelig evening. But when hygge reached the U.S., it became more of a commodity than a state of being. Some Danes take issue with the commercialization of their tradition. But experts say elements of hygge could be beneficial, regardless of how they're packaged. For more check out www.cnbc.com/2019/11/23/what-is-hygge-and-why-are-people-so-obsessed-with-it.html » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Hygge How Hygge Took Over America
Living On $1.6 Million A Year In Los Angeles | Millennial Money
Living On $1.6 Million A Year In Los Angeles | Millennial Money
6 maanden geleden
Graham Stephan, 29, earns $1.6 million a year and lives in Los Angeles. A millionaire by 26, Graham’s income fluctuates between $60,000 and $221,000 per month depending on how much he earns from real estate commissions and NLmind related-revenue. He also owns several rental properties in the Los Angeles area. Between his high income and budget-conscious nature (and 20 cent iced coffee), Graham saves nearly 99% of his income. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Graham's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/2QExENL Graham Stephan pulls up to a high-end Hollywood Hills property in his matte black Tesla Model 3. It’s a four-bed, 2,300-square-foot home listed for $2.169 million by The Oppenheim Group, where Stephan has worked as a realtor since 2015. He’s sold multiple properties like it - and every time he closes a deal, he collects a nice commission check. As of September 2019, Stephan has earned $77,152 in real estate commissions on the five properties he’s sold so far this year. But that represents just a fraction of his income. While the 29-year-old millionaire got his start in real estate, he now earns most of his money making NLmind videos. Stephan, who was born and raised in Los Angeles, never dreamed he’d make his living as a NLmindr. He was earning good money as a realtor, a career he started at 18 after he didn’t get into college. He’d watched NLmind videos for years - “it was my version of TV,” he tells CNBC Make It - but didn’t think he had the personality to be a creator himself. “It looked like such a fun thing to do and I’d always wanted to do it, but I also felt like, Who would want to watch me?” About three years ago, he decided to film and upload a video. It was an explainer on how to be a successful real estate agent that he shot “selfie-style” on his iPhone. “I remember that video getting nine or 10 views,” says Stephan, “and thinking, Oh my God, nine people somewhere have seen this video! So I started making more videos. Once I started doing about two videos a week, the growth really just exploded.” Today, Stephan has close to 1.5 million subscribers across two channels. He earns an average of $90,684 a month on the platform and will bring in well over $1 million for 2019. His videos cover a range of topics, from how to build wealth as a teen to buying a Tesla “for free.” And he regularly posts reaction videos to CNBC Make It’s Millennial Money series, offering commentary on how the subjects could improve their finances. This year will be the first time he’s earned seven figures in a calendar year, a milestone he’s been striving for since 2017. “Two years ago, I made a goal challenge video,” says Stephan. “My goal was to make $1 million in 2018.” He didn’t quite achieve it, but he surprised even himself by hitting it just a year later. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $1.6 Million A Year In Los Angeles | Millennial Money
Are Wagyu Burgers Worth The Money?
Are Wagyu Burgers Worth The Money?
6 maanden geleden
We took a beautiful, 3.5-pound, award- winning A5 Iwate Wagyu steak and did the unthinkable. We ground it up to make prohibitively expensive and ludicrous burgers. While grinding A5 wagyu to make burgers feels criminal, claiming you sell a specific brand of wagyu when you don’t is actually criminal. A 2016 Inside Edition expose allegedly caught two famed restaurants, Le Bernadin and Old Homestead selling mislabeled Kobe beef on their menus. Larry Olmsted, author of Real Food Fake Food, says if you see a Kobe slider on a menu, it’s almost certainly a fake. “So if I if I see Kobe burger, I just assume it's total B.S. because you're not that's never going to be real, he said. “I took a look at some restaurant menus from reliable places that have really five Japanese wagyu and it's already $45 dollars an ounce for this meat. Right. So. Right. That would make a burger $180 before you pay for the bun.” Wagyu has two signifiers, a letter and a number. The letter relates to yield, or the amount of edible meat compared to the total weight of the cow. The yield for our burger is rated A, which means that at least 72 percent of the weight was edible. Yield is typically important to producers. But for us, the eaters, the number is more important. The numbers, which range from 1 to 5, relates to the fat quality, color, texture and how evenly the fat is dispersed throughout the meat. We are going to be trying three 10-ounce burgers. Up first is Porterhouses’ house blend of Prime beef. Second is an American Wagyu made from a 23-ounce Snake River Farms New York strip steak. The last contender is an 11-time champion called A5 Iwate Wagyu. Sorry but the wagyu burgers are not on the menu. Each burger is seasoned with salt and served plain on a sesame bun. Because of their high fat content, the American and wagyu burgers will be cooked in a ripping hot cast iron pan. Porterhouse’s signature burger will be cooked over an open flame. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Are Wagyu Burgers Worth The Money?
How Kanye West Built Yeezy
How Kanye West Built Yeezy
6 maanden geleden
Kanye West grabbed the fashion world’s attention when he debuted sneakers designed in collaboration with Nike in 2009. Retailing at over $200, the shoes were released in extremely limited quantities and sold out instantaneously. They now resell in the thousands of dollars. The success of the shoes finally put West on the map in the fashion industry. For years his designs were met with ridicule. But recently, some of that excitement has turned to skepticism. Certain Yeezy models cost a lot less on the resale market than they used to. And resale prices are a tell-tale sign of a product’s clout, especially for Hypebeasts. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Kanye West Built Yeezy
Living On $112K A Year In Brookfield, Illinois | Millennial Money
Living On $112K A Year In Brookfield, Illinois | Millennial Money
6 maanden geleden
Gabriela Ariza, 27, earns $112,000 a year from her full-time job as a cybersecurity specialist, working part time in the IT department of a library on weekends, and renting out space in her house and garage. Ariza lives in Brookfield, Illinois, nine miles outside of Chicago and has two big financial goals: to purchase an investment property and retire by 55. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Gabriela’s budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/2Xk1Jn5 On a quiet suburban street nine miles outside of Chicago, Gabriela Ariza is showing off her dream car, a ’91 Ford Mustang. It could use a bit of work - the convertible top needs to be replaced and the A/C is broken - but the 27-year-old couldn’t be more proud. She also owns a 2016 Subaru Impreza, which she rents out via Turo, an online car rental platform. Ariza has a lot of experience making the most of her possessions: Not only does she earn extra money renting her car, she also rents out part of her garage to another classic car owner and the second bedroom and basement in her house. Ariza doesn’t necessarily need the extra money - she earns over $100,000 pre-tax between her full-time job as a cybersecurity specialist and her part-time job working in the IT department of a library on the weekends - but it’s part of her plan to accomplish her two big financial goals: buying an investment property and retiring by 55. Ariza already owns her own home in Brookfield, Illinois, has been building up her emergency savings account, and invests aggressively in a 401(k) and Roth IRA. Her own upbringing taught her the importance of financial stability: While she was growing up, her parents were fairly well off, with good jobs and some successful real estate investments. “One day, my dad decided to take all the money,” Ariza tells CNBC Make It. She says he took her college fund, her mom’s retirement savings and all of the couple’s investments. “My mom had to file for bankruptcy, and we were pretty much out in the streets.” Almost a decade later, her mom is doing much better - she has a good job, Ariza says, and will be able to retire soon - but seeing her struggle changed how Ariza relates to money. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $112K A Year In Brookfield, Illinois | Millennial Money
9 Of The Coolest Closets From Dan Bilzerian To Celine Dion
9 Of The Coolest Closets From Dan Bilzerian To Celine Dion
7 maanden geleden
These homes have closets you won't believe - from a closet in Gigi and Bella Hadid's childhood home to Instagram star Dan Bilzerian's six-figure bong collection to Celine Dion's diva-sized closet. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt 9 Of The Coolest Closets From Dan Bilzerian To Celine Dion
How Oatly Built A $100 Million Oat Milk Empire
How Oatly Built A $100 Million Oat Milk Empire
7 maanden geleden
Oatly sat in relative obscurity in Sweden for its first 20 years. In 2012, the oat milk company brought in a new CEO, Toni Petersson, with a radical new vision for the brand and with a new look and a tasty product, Oatly set its sights on America. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Oatly Built A $100 Million Oat Milk Empire
Living On $48K A Year In Helsinki, Finland | Millennial Money
Living On $48K A Year In Helsinki, Finland | Millennial Money
7 maanden geleden
Maria Ainamo-McDonald, 30, earns the equivalent of $48,000 a year as a marketing specialist at the broadcasting company YLE. She lives in Helsinki, Finland where she’s been able to buy two homes before turning 30. Here’s how Maria earns, spends and saves her money in the happiest country in the world. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Maria's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/33a1Tje Maria lives comfortably on $48,000, but in an ideal world, would make closer to $75,000. She picked that amount after reading studies that suggest you need about that much to be happy. While it’s a goal in the back of her mind, “I don’t actively work for that to happen,” she adds. “I don’t do my work because of money. I do my work because I enjoy it.” Ainamo-McDonald spends about $527 per month on groceries, including diapers, for the whole family. She also spends an additional $111 eating out. That’s enough to cover just one night out for the family at a nice restaurant. “In Finland, going out for dinner is super expensive, especially if you want to have alcohol,” she says. She gets lunch at work every day. It costs about $8 and is taken straight out of her paycheck. Ainamo-McDonald bought her first apartment in Helsinki, Finland, at 26. She recently sold it, came out $21,000* ahead and used the profits to upgrade to a bigger home that she shares with her husband, Duke, and their two-year-old son. It was a significant purchase: The four-bedroom apartment cost $326,000 all-in. The couple put $78,000 down, financed the rest and split the $932 monthly mortgage payment, which includes interest. Plus, she plans on staying put for a while. “I was born in Helsinki,” she says. “And I’ve always liked Helsinki.” You can’t beat the health-care system and parental leave policy, she adds. “In my humble opinion, Finland is the best place to have kids.” It’s also the happiest country, according to the 2019 World Happiness Report. Aianamo-McDonald agrees with the assessment. “Everything is very good in this country: Everybody has food and shelter and free education, which I think is the key. You have the possibility of being very happy here - then, of course, it’s up to the individual to decide if they want to grab that chance.” *CNBC Make It converted Euros to USD using the OANDA conversion rate of 1 Euro to 1.10924 USD on October 29, 2019. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $48K A Year In Helsinki, Finland | Millennial Money
Is This Wine Worth $300 A Bottle?
Is This Wine Worth $300 A Bottle?
7 maanden geleden
Ao Yun is the first luxury wine from China. It costs around $300 per bottle and it's hard to get. Only 2,500 cases are produced each vintage and 30% of that is sold in China. When you think of high-end wine you think about places like France, Italy, or maybe Napa Valley. So is Ao Yun worth $300 a bottle? There are three primary factors that determine the price of a bottle of wine: how much it costs to make each bottle, the weather - the amount of wine produced each vintage can vary dramatically, and sales and marketing costs. Ao Yun received an average critic score of 90 out of 100. The company also has some firepower behind it: Moet Hennessy’s parent company LVMH also owns Dom Pérignon and Veuve Cliquot. In 2008, Moet Hennessy sent famed Australian winemaker Tony Jordan to China in search of a new terroir. Four years later he found a perfect plot for a vineyard in a remote area of the Yunnan province, about 8,000 feet up in the Himalayan Mountains four hours from Shangri La. The location had exactly what Moet Hennessy was looking for: A micro-climate with optimum temperature, high elevation, mountains to shield it from too much rain, strong sun and a good diversity of soils. It makes sense for Moet Hennessy to look to China as a growth area. In 2018 China ranked fifth in terms of total wine consumption consuming 18 million hectoliters just behind Germany and Italy. One hectoliter is equal to one hundred liters. Americans drank some 33 million hectoliters of wine, which was good enough to put it in first place. So far, all of the vintages of Ao Yun on offer were made with grapes from the pre existing vineyard, which were planted in the year 2000. Those bottles launched in 2016. Ao Yun is meant to prove that Chinese wine can compete with the best in the world. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Is This Chinese Wine Worth $300 A Bottle?
Inside Four Mansions With Underground Secrets
Inside Four Mansions With Underground Secrets
7 maanden geleden
These four mega-homes have hidden secrets buried underneath them - from a stealth mancave and subterranean tennis court, to insane underground pools and secret passageways. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Inside Four Mansions With Underground Secrets
Living On $80K A Year In Washington, D.C. | Millennial Money
Living On $80K A Year In Washington, D.C. | Millennial Money
7 maanden geleden
Angel Thompson, 28 lives in Washington, D.C. and earns $80,000 a year as a project manager of cultural resources at the National Park Foundation. She helps lead the foundation’s efforts to digitally preserve and share African American history, culture and community stories through America’s national parks. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Angel's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/32pTaJ7 Thompson earns $80,000 a year as a project manager of cultural resources at the National Park Foundation.The position combines Thompson’s passion for African American history and culture with her interest in improving the visitor experience at museums. Plus, she gets to travel all over the country to visit the sites of the projects she works on, including the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park in Atlanta and the Harriet Tubman National Historical Park in Auburn, New York. his is still a relatively new gig for Thompson: She was unemployed for six months after losing her previous job during the federal government shutdown earlier this year. But her new role came with a big salary bump. “Prior to being at the National Park Foundation, I was earning $45,000 a year working for the federal government,” she says. Thompson purchased her house in 2017 with the help of D.C.’s Home Purchase Assistance Program (HPAP), which helps residents with low-to-moderate incomes afford homes in the city. Thompson was making $45,000 at the time, which qualified her for the program. She received a $64,000 loan from HPAP, and if she lives in the home for at least 15 years, she doesn’t have to pay the money back, she says. That’s just fine with Thompson - she never wants to leave D.C. “I’m a native Washingtonian,” she says. “I don’t see myself living anywhere else.” » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $80K A Year In Washington, DC | Millennial Money
Friends Discuss Their Money Secrets
Friends Discuss Their Money Secrets
7 maanden geleden
These five pairs of best friends reveal everything from student loan debt to dating for free meals. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Friends Discuss Their Money Secrets
How Supreme Built A Billion Dollar Brand Empire
How Supreme Built A Billion Dollar Brand Empire
7 maanden geleden
Apparel brand Supreme started as a small and edgy New York City skateboard shop in 1994, and with word of mouth marketing and a product-scarcity strategy, it has grown into a global brand with a cult following and a billion-dollar valuation. Since its conception in 1994, underground streetwear brand Supreme has transformed from a small indie skateshop in New York to a $1 billion global company with a massive following. Some have equated Supreme’s success to the scarcity in its supply, often creating spiraling lines of people camping out in lawn chairs all night, making their items skyrocket in resale value with quadruple-figure price tags. Founder James Jebbia initially justified their limited supply as a way to avoid leftover items that no one wants, however this has strategically resulted in instant sellouts when new product lines are released. Desperate for apparel ownership, Supreme’s cult-like following of "hypebeasts" has purchased every obscure accessory from fire extinguishers to nunchucks and crowbars creating a global phenomenon that is attracting copycats and underground resellers. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Supreme How Supreme Built A Billion Dollar Brand Empire
These Mansions Have Backyard Waterparks And Insane Pools
These Mansions Have Backyard Waterparks And Insane Pools
8 maanden geleden
Take a look at these insane pools. These 4 mega-mansions all make a splash when it comes to outdoor living, from over-the-top water slides, to a haunted water park, and even a luxurious water-filled resort built by pop music superstar Celine Dion. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt These Mansions Have Backyard Waterparks And Insane Pools
Why You Spend So Much Money At Ikea
Why You Spend So Much Money At Ikea
8 maanden geleden
Ikea was founded in 1943 by a young Swedish man named Ingvar Kamprad. Today, there are 433 stores in 53 countries. The name Ikea comes from Ingvar's first and last initial, the farm he grew up on - Elmtaryd - and the village he lived near - Agunnaryd. Initially the company started by selling pencils and postcards. In 1948, it began selling furniture, and the rest is history. In fiscal year 2019, Ikea sold 7 million Billy bookcases, and brought in $45 billion in retail sales. At the heart of Ikea's success is value: You know what you're going to get when you shop at Ikea, and it's going to be affordable. In fact, price is so important to Ikea's strategy that the company first decides on the price of a piece of furniture and then reverse engineers the construction, the company says. Ikea has a "democratic design approach," according to Antonella Pucarelli, the chief commercial officer of Ikea retail U.S., which means that it "deliver[s] form, function and quality products at a low price. Even though our products are affordable, we don't compromise on quality," she says. (Ikea has had high profile recalls of millions of chests and dressers after several tipped over, killing children. In response, Ikea admitted the chests and dressers could be dangerous and offered free kits to anchor the chests and dressers to the wall, as well as refunds.) Some of Ikea's furniture is made from wood, some is made from particleboard (recycled wood chips fused together), keeping production more affordable. Ikea furniture is shipped and sold in flat-packs, which makes transporting it cheaper, and customers put it together themselves (or pay for someone to do it for them), keeping labor costs down. And the trademark simple style of the furniture Ikea sells is not just because it's a Scandinavian aesthetic. It's easier and cheaper to make affordable versions of such furniture look good. "Ikea's aesthetic is pared down and minimal, which is not an accident. Uncomplicated forms with very little applied decoration are easier to manufacture. More can be produced in a shorter amount of time, increasing efficiency and decreasing production costs," Ashlie Broderic, interior designer for Broderic Design, tells CNBC Make It. "The Malm bed is an excellent example of simple rectangular shapes combined to create a very chic bed." And "most of Ikea's furniture is available in black, white, or unfinished wood. By producing more items in fewer finishes, Ikea takes advantage of economy of scale," she says. All this makes Ikea's "aesthetic per dollar" ratio very high, says neuromarketer and author of "The Buying Brain" Dr. A. K. Pradeep. Ikea's affordable style is its "category-busting-metric," or what makes it stand out from all the other brands in that space, he says. The brain looks for a single defining characteristic to differentiate among brands, products and services, and if that's not easily identified, the brain falls back to price, says Pradeep, who has worked with companies including Coca-Cola, Procter & Gamble, Pepsi, Subway and Mondelez in the neuromarketing space. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Ikea Why You Spend So Much Money At Ikea
Living On $172K A Year In NYC | Millennial Money
Living On $172K A Year In NYC | Millennial Money
8 maanden geleden
Drake Pooley, 23, lives in New York, NY, and earns $172,000 a year as a consulting associate. He earns a base of $120,000 with an additional $47,250 in compensation from his bonus, profit share and extra 401(k) match. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Drake's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/2AHq4Zq As an associate management consultant for a top New York City-based firm, the 23-year-old spends Monday through Thursday in a different U.S. city - Chicago, Cincinnati and Nashville are all recent destinations - helping organizations come up with solutions for the problems plaguing them. He frequently finds himself working out of hotel rooms at 11 p.m., but doesn't mind the long days. Working hard, Pooley says, is in his blood. His dad is an entrepreneur who is always coming up with a new business idea to test out. But it's his grandmother, a Lithuanian who came to the U.S. from Venezuela at 14, who Pooley most admires. "My grandmother was actually a refugee. She was the hardest working person I ever met," he says. On the side, he coaches Chinese college students on U.S. and Chinese employment processes, helping them navigate the beginnings of their careers in a foreign country. He charges $100 per hour and brings in around $400 per month. "I've lived in China twice, and I'm very familiar with how Chinese students think and also the cultural differences," he says. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $172K A Year In NYC | Millennial Money
How Crystals Became A Multi-Billion Dollar Industry
How Crystals Became A Multi-Billion Dollar Industry
8 maanden geleden
The Tucson Gem and Mineral showcase is the nucleus of the mineral trade in the US. Thousands of miners and sellers from all over the world descend on Tuscan to buy and sell crystals of all types sizes and values. In 2018, a three-and-a-half foot red tourmaline crystal was up for sale. Experts say some $5 billion worth of crystals are sold in a three-week period. How did healing Crystals go from a holistic cottage industry to mainstream markets? Traditionally, there have been two types of buyers at the showcase: Mineral collectors and high-end gem retailers like Tiffany's and Cartier. But there’s a new wave of consumers causing a sort of mania in the gem and mineral market: healers. The recent wave of interest in crystals started in the 1970’s with white quartz. Since then, demand has continued to grow due to increased interest in alternative healing methods bolstered by celebrity endorsements. There are several tiers of crystal sellers: At the low end are online retailers who mainly deal in good-looking but inexpensive stones ranging in price from $5 to $1,000. In the middle are galleries and high-end Internet sellers. Those crystals sell for $1,000 to $10,000. Anything above $10,000 is at the very high end of the market. Whether or not the crystals have scientifically-proven metaphysical powers is up for debate but people are pouring large sums of money into them. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Crystals Became A Multi-Billion Dollar Industry | Suddenly Obsessed
Inside Four $100+ Million Mega-Mansions
Inside Four $100+ Million Mega-Mansions
8 maanden geleden
Take a peek inside four of the most expensive homes in America. These mega-mansions are packed with over-the-top features -including a four-lane bowling alley, secret underground tunnels, and a giant $2 million TV that rises up from the pool. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Inside Four $100+ Million Mega-Mansions
How Pumpkin Spice Became A $600 Million Flavor
How Pumpkin Spice Became A $600 Million Flavor
8 maanden geleden
This year, Starbucks introduced its seasonal pumpkin spice latte on August 27th - the earliest date ever. Last year, Forbes and Nielsen valued the overall pumpkin spice industry - with products from brands including Pop-Tarts, Sam Adams, and Chobani - at $600 million. More than any other brand, Starbucks brought pumpkin spice to the masses with its latte, which the company first released in 2003. How did a single flavor come to take over the fall season - and is there still room for growth? Or have we reached peak pumpkin spice? *** Correction *** This video misstates the date on which Starbucks released its pumpkin spice latte in 2019. It was August 27, not August 29. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Pumpkin Spice Became A $600 Million Flavor
Kal Penn On Life After 'Harold And Kumar'
Kal Penn On Life After 'Harold And Kumar'
8 maanden geleden
Kal Penn's career took off after 'Harold and Kumar go to White Castle,' but he struggled to find a job after his breakthrough role, even Jamba Juice wouldn't hire him. His new show 'Sunnyside' airs on NBC Thursday nights at 9:30 p.m. ET. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Sunnyside Kal Penn On Life After 'Harold And Kumar'
Are Hermes Birkin Bags Worth $10K+?
Are Hermes Birkin Bags Worth $10K+?
8 maanden geleden
In 2019, a diamond-encrusted crocodile Birkin bag sold for $500,000. The Birkin bag, made by French luxury brand Hermes, is named after actress Jane Birkin. It consistently shatters sales records at auction, selling in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. But experts say the bag cost just $2,000 at its inception in 1984. We looked at how Hermes elevated the Birkin to a status symbol and collector's item and whether or not the Birkin bag is a solid investment. Correction: The Ferrari featured in the video is actually a Ferrari 458, not a Ferrari 812 Superfast. The retail price of a base-model Ferrari 458 is under $300,000. According to David Oancea, who purchased the $500,000 diamond-encrusted crocodile Birkin mentioned above and $2,000,000 of Hermes Birkin bags overall, they're a solid investment. He claims to have been offered $680,000 for the bag, a nearly 40% profit. By owning a Birkin he's part of an exclusive club that includes Melania Trump, Miranda Kerr, Katie Perry, Victoria Beckman, and the Kardashian / Jenner clan. The Birkin bag also has fans amongst those who have created businesses and personas based off of the bag. Monika Arora is the founder of Pursebop.com, a destination for Birkin bag enthusiasts. Jane Angert is the president and artistic director of JaneFinds, a company that helps buyers find rare Birkin bags. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Birkin Are Hermes Birkin Bags Worth $10K (or more)?
Living On $230K A Year In West Chicago, Illinois | Millennial Money
Living On $230K A Year In West Chicago, Illinois | Millennial Money
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Alex Sanchez earns $230,000 a year as an overhead lineman for the electric utility company of the Chicagoland area. In addition to his base salary of approximately $120,000 he earns a $10,000 annual bonus and is on track to earn over $200,000 with overtime included. He also has two side hustles to help pad his savings account and investment portfolio. Here's how Alex makes and spends his money. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Alex's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/2m2QVuS A fan of the FIRE - financial independence, retire early - community, Alex would like to be a millionaire by 30. As a first-generation American he's planning to help his parents, who immigrated from Mexico and met in the West Chicago area, retire comfortably one day. Sanchez says he grew up lower middle class, and while his parents provided everything he and his brother, Oscar, could need, they also often missed events, like his baseball games, because they had to work. Investing and saving a significant portion of his income has become a way for Sanchez to ensure that he has the flexibility to choose how he spends his time. Should he have children of his own one day, he doesn't want to miss out on Little League for work. And he wants to make sure his parents aren't tied to their jobs forever. Sanchez's income fluctuates depending on overtime hours and how much business his lawn-care company drums up. Since he dropped out of college he does not have student loans. The utility company he currently works for paid for his training as a lineman. Sanchez owns three rental properties, including an apartment, a condo and a single-family house that he co-owns with his mother. The properties gross $3,825 per month, and he takes home $1,600 per month, after expenses like taxes and insurance. His mother makes $500 from the property she co-owns with him. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $230K A Year In West Chicago, Illinois | Millennial Money
What It’s Like Working Behind The Scenes As A Roadie
What It’s Like Working Behind The Scenes As A Roadie
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Eric Hillman is a roadie and guitar technician for multiple rock bands that travel across the world. His responsibilities include running a “bass rig” for P-Nut, the bass player of the band 311, managing the guitar for the band’s lead singer/guitarist Nick Hexum and managing sounds from the side of the stage. He let CNBC Make It have a look inside his life on the road, which made a stop in Philadelphia - one of more than 20 stops on the summer tour. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf During our day at The Met in Philadelphia, we had an all-access pass before the rock band 311 hit the stage. Hillman does everything from unloading crates to tuning the guitars and making sure each guitar effect is plugged in and working correctly. He’s also responsible for some of the band’s social media, posting pictures and videos of the band while on tour and in their studio. “I wake up in the morning on a tour bus,” Hillman said. “Sometimes we’ll fly into shows. Wake up in a hotel or something, but get out here to stage and catch cases.” Life on the road may not be for everyone, but Hillman said he sleeps “great” on the buses. “It’s small quarters,” he said. “Fifteen years later, we’re best buds. Bus bros even. And it’s a blast.” Hillman has worked for bands including Dirty Heads, Pepper, Sublime with Rome, Slightly Stoopid and others in their circuit. ″We’ll meet on tour. Their guy can’t make it, they’ll call me,” he said. But Hillman is loyal to 311 because of how close his relationship is to Hexum and P-Nut, he said. “I’d had this guitar tech for a few years. And right before the tour, he decides, ‘Ah, I don’t really want to tour anymore. I want to stay home with my girl,’” said lead singer and guitarist of 311, Nick Hexum. “So I was completely in a panic. And our studio manager, Jason, was like, ’You should call Cousin Eric.” He quickly emerged as one of the greatest, probably the best roadie we’ve had.” “But I never knew this job existed until I had it,” Hillman said. “And then the first show of their 2007 run was when I joined.” Many of the gigs pay “very well,” Hillman said. “My first tour I came in at a beginner’s rate and then was given a raise after my first year,” he said. “Making up to $5,000 a week is not unrealistic at all. It’s one gig that you can live wherever you want because as long as there’s an airport nearby, you can fly to your next gig. Or at least to your next tour.” Of course, the job isn’t without its stresses, he said. “To name everything that could go wrong in a day, you’d have to be with me for a week,” he said. “Tube could blow on an amplifier, a wireless frequency for a microphone could get interrupted or just completely drop. Or if you’re in a big city or around military bases, their wireless frequencies are totally jammed up. So it’s all about diagnosing it quickly and fixing it so you get back to the show.” The hardest part of the job, he said, has “nothing to do with the stage.” “It’s being away from people you love,” Hillman said. ”Being away from family. It never gets easier. It actually gets harder. Man, I send postcards at home all the time. Kind of old school, but people at home appreciate the mailbox love.” And Hillman has some traits that make him well-suited to the job, the band says. “There’s the unspoken thing, which is having a good attitude and being a pleasant person to be around,” says Hexum. “If somebody starts to get an attitude, we might call them a ‘white glove roadie.’ Cousin Eric is the opposite of that.” “Man, I just love being around music and being around rock ’n roll,” Hillman said. “The vibe. It’s definitely a dream job. It’s a job I didn’t know was a real thing. But after living it and experiencing it, yeah, it’s definitely a dream job.” About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Roadie What It’s Like Working Behind The Scenes As A Roadie | CNBC Make It.
Is A $12 Pint Of Ice Cream Worth The Money?
Is A $12 Pint Of Ice Cream Worth The Money?
8 maanden geleden
It seems like pricy artisanal ice cream is everywhere these days. Once limited to brands like Ben & Jerry's and Haagen-Dazs, the premium ice cream freezer at the grocery store is crowded with ice cream that's handmade and includes top dollar ingredients. While brands like Halo Top, Ample Hills, and Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams are for sale in a larger number of stores, the price can result in sticker shock. A pint of Jeni's Splendid Ice Cream retails for $12 a pint. Here's why pints have sky-rocked in price. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Is A $12 Pint Of Ice Cream Worth The Money?
What It's Like Working On A New York City Food Truck
What It's Like Working On A New York City Food Truck
9 maanden geleden
Food trucks are everywhere in most major cities in the United States, including New York City. To understand what it's really like to run a successful food truck, we spent a full day with the crew of Yumpling, which has served traditional Taiwanese food since 2017. The day starts at 1am when co-owner Christopher Yu picks up the truck and stakes out a parking spot in Brooklyn or Manhattan. After parking the truck, Chris turns on the generator, which powers the food truck's refrigerator and freezer. Because of New York City regulations that state someone must remain in the truck while it's parked, Chris will camp out for the rest of the night. He can't sleep in the back of the truck and must remain at the wheel. The truck doesn't have heat or air conditioning, which can make for tough winters and summers. Morning prep starts at 7 am when the team prepares salads, fries chicken, cooks rice, and labels containers for lunch, which Yumpling starts serving at 11:30 am. Some customers begin lining up as soon as 11 am. On the morning we spent with Yumpling there was a line down the street five minutes after they opened. The truck doesn't pay rent in the traditional sense, but it does accumulate parking tickets throughout the day. Parking tickets for the truck range in price from $65 to hundreds of dollars. Some days the truck receives two or three tickets, while on others it manages to avoid parking fines. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt What It's Like Working On A New York City Food Truck
Living On $110K A Year In Tampa, Florida | Millennial Money
Living On $110K A Year In Tampa, Florida | Millennial Money
9 maanden geleden
Hemant Saria earns $110,000 a year as a pilot based in Tampa, Florida. The 33-year-old is a first officer on a Boeing 747 cargo airplane and is currently paying off $32,000 in student loans while saving to buy a house with his fiancee. Here's how Hermant makes and spends his money. This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Read more about Hemant's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/2m4GzdZ Saria originally began flying as a pilot so he could save enough money to buy a motorcycle, but he quickly fell in love with flying. He now flies for roughly 15 to 16 consecutive days each month before having two weeks off. As a cargo pilot he earns $110 per hour, plus more for overtime. He's guaranteed 64 hours per month, but can hit over 100 during busy periods. His guaranteed base salary is $85,000 a year, plus an additional $13,000 in overtime. He also receives between $10,000 and $12,000 to cover daily expenses while he's flying. Saria's company offers plenty of opportunity for growth: He expects his base salary to increase 10% to 15% annually over the next five years, and once he becomes a captain his earnings will almost double. "You can expect to make at least $200,000 to $250,000 a year," he says. Although Saria's income is irregular, he and his fiancee base their monthly budget on a set amount. Each month, they expect to have $5,000 to work with after salary deductions for taxes, health insurance and retirement savings, even if he actually brings in more. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $110K A Year In Tampa, Florida | Millennial Money
When To Bring Up Salary In A Job Interview
When To Bring Up Salary In A Job Interview
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Traditionally, experts advised candidates to avoid discussing salary until an offer was on the table. According to bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch, it's now acceptable to discuss salary up front in today's economy. According to Welch, "hiring managers are sweating bullets these days. Good candidates are hard to find and even harder to land." » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt When To Bring Up Salary In A Job Interview
How S'well Leveraged Starbucks To Become A Status Symbol
How S'well Leveraged Starbucks To Become A Status Symbol
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It seems like S'well bottles are everywhere, but that required a leap of faith from founder Sarah Kauss. In 2010, the former Ernst & Young CPA invested $30,000 of her own money to design a reusable water bottle. While Krauss was concerned with the environmental impact of single use plastic water bottles, she wasn't thrilled with the hippie chic look of existing reusable water bottles. Her first big break came in 2011 when Oprah's O Magazine offered to feature S'well in its O List. Two years later, Starbucks called and offered to place her bottles in stores as part of a trial run. She happened to run into Howard Schultz, Starbucks' CEO at the time, and convinced him to make S'well bottles the centerpiece of a Starbucks holiday campaign. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How S'well Leveraged Starbucks To Become A Status Symbol
Jay Leno Used To Sleep In His Car In Los Angeles
Jay Leno Used To Sleep In His Car In Los Angeles
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When Jay Leno moved to Los Angeles in the early 1970s, the first thing he bought was a car. Leno still owns the 1955 Buick Roadmaster, which he's featured on his CNBC show “Jay Leno’s Garage.” The car only cost him $350. After purchasing the car, Jay Leno couldn’t afford an apartment, so he slept in his Roadmaster. He also squatted in empty houses that were on the market and at times spent the night in the back of a police car. Jay Leno isn’t the only successful person who went to extremes to save money before making it big. In his 20s, billionaire Mark Cuban aimed to live on as little as possible. “I did things like having five roommates and living off of macaroni and cheese, ” he told Money in 2017. Like Leno, he also drove super cheap cars, including a 1966 Buick LeSabre and a Fiat X1/9 with a hole in the floorboard. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #JayLeno Jay Leno Used To Sleep In His Car In Los Angeles
Kevin O'Leary: How Much Money You Should Save By 33
Kevin O'Leary: How Much Money You Should Save By 33
9 maanden geleden
Kevin O'Leary explains just how much money you should have by the time you are 33 years old and why it's important. “By the time you hit 33 years old, you should have $100,000 saved somewhere. Make that your goal. Thirty-three [and] $100,000,” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. According to Kevin O'Leary, 33 is the point where you could fall behind if you haven't started saving. While $100,000 might sound "impossible" to many Americas, O'Leary believes it's possible to save this much if you start saving early enough. For example, if you’re 22 and making a median salary of $48,400 (for new graduates), and you start saving 20% per paycheck, that amounts to $9,680 a year. Even if you keep the same salary and assume no interest, saving that amount for 11 years gets you $106,480 by the age of 33. By investing the same money, and assuming O’Leary’s 5% growth, that gives you $144,397 in the same amount of time. (The S&P 500 Index has averaged annual returns of approximately 10% since its inception in 1926.) » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #KevinOLeary Kevin O'Leary: Here's How Much Money You Should Save By 33
How One Couple Avoided Debt On A 7-Month Vacation
How One Couple Avoided Debt On A 7-Month Vacation
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Lauren and Steven Keys visited 61 national parks in seven months, starting in January 2019. The couple avoided going into debt along the way, through several key cost-saving measures including living in a van and working side hustles along the way. They share six strategies for making and saving money while on the road, turning travel into more of a lifestyle rather than just a vacation. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #VanLife How One Couple Avoided Debt On A 7 Month Vacation
Living On $50K A Year In Brooklyn | Millennial Money
Living On $50K A Year In Brooklyn | Millennial Money
9 maanden geleden
Elena Haskins earns $50,000 a year as a graphic designer in Brooklyn, New York. The 23-year-old has $11,000 in student debt, but her salary is enough for her to live 'comfortably' in New York City. She also has a freelance photography side hustle and recently launched a website that serves as a guide for recent college grads. Read more about Elena's budget breakdown here: cnb.cx/2KNj6I9 This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Eleana Haskins moved to New York City after graduating from college in the spring of 2018. She may be a recent college graduate, but she's not a novice when it comes to work. “I’ve always had part-time jobs,” she tells CNBC Make It. “I think it’s important to have a side income, even if you have support from your family. You want to have your own money.” In addition to her full-time job as an associate designer at PEI, a finance media and conference company, Haskins has several side hustles including a freelance photography gig and a website for recent college grads. While her side hustles don't boost her income significantly, she appreciates the extra income. Haskins, who started her full-time job in September 2018, is happy with her $50,000 starting salary, but her goal is to make $100,000 a year by age 30. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $50k A Year In Brooklyn | Millennial Money
Kevin O'Leary: How To Send A Cold Email
Kevin O'Leary: How To Send A Cold Email
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Kevin O'Leary, "Shark Tank" star, investor and small business owner frequently receives emails asking for his help. Since O'Leary places a premium on his time, nothing bothers him more than the "let's do lunch" cliche. “I really hate it, and I get a lot of this, ‘Let’s do lunch,’” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “How about we don’t do lunch but you tell me what you really want in the first place.” If you want to grab Kevin O'Leary's attention over email, make sure to keep the message short. He never reads beyond the first paragraph. Ideally you should get your message across in the first sentence and be as specific as possible. O’Leary says it’s critical for the next generation of entrepreneurs to learn how to effectively communicate if they want to succeed in today’s economy. Rambling in email, he says, won’t get you there, “nobody reads it [and] that’s the truth.” » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #KevinOLeary Kevin O'Leary: How To Send A Cold Email
Why The 'Sober Curious' Movement Is Big Business For Millennials
Why The 'Sober Curious' Movement Is Big Business For Millennials
9 maanden geleden
Whether it's to break a bad habit, minimize hangovers or for health reasons, millennials are drinking less alcohol. As the "Sober Curious" movement gains steam, it’s no surprise that alcohol-free cocktails are vying for a permanent spot on the bar scene. And many young people are willing to pay the price. Listen Bar is one of several new alcohol-free spaces that’s recently started in the US. Its owner, Lorelei Bandrovschi, tested the concept in Williamsburg in October 2018 and now runs a popular, once-a-month pop-up in New York City. Alcohol-free cocktails aren’t cheap, averaging at $13 at places like Listen Bar in NYC. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Why The Sober Curious Movement Is Big Business For Millennials
Elon Musk And Andrew Yang Support UBI -  Is America Ready?
Elon Musk And Andrew Yang Support UBI - Is America Ready?
9 maanden geleden
Universal basic income (or UBI) is a key part of Andrew Yang's campaign for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. On Monday, Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk tweeted his support for Yang's candidacy. Musk and Yang have stated similar views on the need for universal basic income in the United States. A main tenet of Yang's campaign platform is his pledge to provide $1,000 a month to all American citizens 18 and older. Yang refers to this payment as a "Freedom Dividend" that will become necessary as robots and automation replace humans more rapidly than people can find and be retained for new jobs. UBI is making its way from the fringes to a serious topic of debate thanks to a growing number of high profile advocates, including Elon Musk, Mark Zuckerberg and Richard Branson, and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang. So far, the results of some UBI experiments have been controversial. Is America ready for universal basic income? *** UPDATE *** Andrew Yang’s campaign reached out to us on August 16th to clarify that the Freedom Dividend would stack with Social Security and Veteran's Disability: According to Yang's plan, veterans with a disability will continue to receive benefits on top of the Freedom Dividend. Social Security retirement and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits will also stack with the Freedom Dividend. Those receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI), another form of disability benefit, would have to choose between SSI or the Freedom Dividend whichever is more generous. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Elon Musk And Andrew Yang Support UBI - Is America Ready?
Kevin O'Leary: I Spend $1K A Day On Food
Kevin O'Leary: I Spend $1K A Day On Food
10 maanden geleden
Kevin O'Leary, investor and host of "Shark Tank" might give out smart advice when it comes to saving, investing, and budgeting, but he admits that he sets a "bad example" when it comes to his food budget. Here's why Kevin O'Leary spends $1,000 on food a day. O'Leary justifies this budget item as a business expense. For O'Leary, breakfast meetings, business lunches, and dinners are a necessary cost of doing business. “For example, today’s breakfast cost me about $200,” O’Leary told CNBC Make It in July in New York City. “It was a very important meeting with somebody I have to do business with.” For those just starting out, Kevin O'Leary suggests not spending more than 20% of your after-tax paycheck on dining out. If you want to be "smart," keep your expenses at 10% of your biweekly paycheck and eat at home four days a week at minimum. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Kevin O'Leary: I Spend $1k A Day On Food
How BTS Won Over America
How BTS Won Over America
9 maanden geleden
BTS is taking the American music scene by storm. The seven-member boy band from South Korea has had three No. 1 albums on the Billboard chart. The music video for their single, "Boy with Luv," broke NLmind's record for the most views in 24 hours. And the group just wrapped up a six-stop U.S. stadium tour that raked in $44 million and attracted nearly 300,000 fans, according to Billboard. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #BTS Why America Is Obsessed With BTS
Is Nobu's Most Expensive Sushi Worth It?
Is Nobu's Most Expensive Sushi Worth It?
9 maanden geleden
The omakase menu option at chef Nobu Matsuhisa's namesake sushi restaurants runs nearly $200 per head. With locations in Beverly Hills, Aspen, and NYC, his restaurants count celebs like Justin Bieber and the Kardashian-Jenner clan. That's expensive, but it's by no means the most expensive sushi in the world, let alone New York. We set out to answer whether Nobu is worth the price and how does the quality of Chef Nobu's menu compare to an average New York City sushi restaurant? CNBC Make It compared an average sushi joint in the city to Nobu, where Chef Nobu showed us his spin on his favorite cheap rolls, as well as some of the pricier options on his menu. My wife and I eat sushi for dinner about once a month which I admit isn't necessarily a cheap habit. My usual order at Taro, our go-to place in Brooklyn, is the edomae chirashi bowl which costs $30. It has variety of ten pieces of fish from mackerel to toro (fatty tuna cut from the belly of the fish) and uni (sea urchin) served on a bed of rice and seaweed. I find it a perfect balance between price and value. Our bill usually comes in under $80, tip included. We avoid the more expensive restaurants like Nobu Downtown where a single piece of toro costs $17. A similar cut costs $8.50 at Taro. And Nobu Downtown is by no means the most expensive sushi restaurant in New York, not even close. Dinner at the Hinoki Counter at Sushi Noz in Manhattan consists of a 6-course tasting menu and a selection of nigiri, a single piece of fish served on rice, for $300 per person. The beverage pairing costs an additional $175 per person. A two-hour dinner at Masa costs $595 per person, not including beverages and tax. Thankfully, gratuity is not accepted. The check average at Nobu Downtown is $135. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #Nobu Is Nobu's Most Expensive Sushi Worth It?
Living On $38K A Year In Charlotte, NC | Millennial Money
Living On $38K A Year In Charlotte, NC | Millennial Money
10 maanden geleden
Chloe Potter works as a loan specialist in Charlotte, but she has ambitions to run her own coffee shop. This is how she spends her money. Read more about Chloe's budget breakdown: cnb.cx/2yK2pXq This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. Chloe Potter, 26, moved to Charlotte, North Carolina, nearly two years ago. She’d been living at home in Boca Raton, Florida, after graduating from college and was ready for a change, she tells CNBC Make It: “I wanted to be in a space that I could make mine and start my own life.” She considered big cities like New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles, but the cost of living was too high. “I ended up doing a bunch of research and finding out that Charlotte was a growing city with a lot of job opportunities,” she says. Plus, it’s a place where she felt she could “make it work financially.” She borrowed $1,000 from her grandmother to make the move and couch-surfed for a few months while job searching. She landed a 9-to-5 job at a mortgage company and waited tables on the side to save enough money to pay back her grandmother and rent an apartment. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $38k A Year In Charlotte, NC | Millennial Money
Ramit Sethi: How To Recession-Proof Your Life
Ramit Sethi: How To Recession-Proof Your Life
10 maanden geleden
Personal finance expert Ramit Sethi explains how to handle an unpredictable market. According to the author of "I Will Teach You To Be Rich," "you can't time the market, but success is about time in the market." Sethi advisers investors to consistently save and invest every month without paying attention to the market Since the 2008 financial crisis, it seems like experts have been predicting that the next recession is just around the corner. It’s common to see news stating that economic indicators show the economy is poised to tumble or an economist pointing to the next bubble. These articles can be informative, but financial coach Ramit Sethi, author of the best-selling book “I Will Teach You to Be Rich,” says young people shouldn’t take them too seriously. Even to seasoned investors, the market is unpredictable. “Nobody knows if the stock market is going up or down tomorrow, much less six months or 12 months from now,” Sethi tells CNBC Make It. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Ramit Sethi: How To Recession-Proof Your Life
Why Kevin O'Leary Expects His Employees To Work On Vacation
Why Kevin O'Leary Expects His Employees To Work On Vacation
10 maanden geleden
Kevin O'Leary, Shark Tank host, explains why he expects all of his employees to work on vacation. “I don’t have a division anymore between vacation time and work. It’s always both,” O’Leary tells CNBC Make It. “I work every day.” That rule also applies to his employees: “Do I expect my employees to respond to me when they’re on vacation? 100%,” he says. When it comes work, O’Leary says he doesn’t care whether his employees are on vacation, taking a personal day or coming into the office at a later time: “I just want you to get the task done. How you do it is your business,” he says. The investor has roughly 35 employees within all of his O’Leary Financial Group divisions, which include O’Leary Ventures, O’Leary books and O’Leary Fine Wines. “My employees are all over the country and sometimes all over the world. They’re working 24/7, or they’re not, but they’re getting the job done, and that’s the way the economy is going to roll. You don’t have a 9-to-5 anymore,” he says. According to a recent LinkedIn survey, O’Leary may not have to convince his American employees to work while on vacation. Nearly 60% of the workers who were surveyed said they engage in work duties while taking time off, amid mounting pressure to always be on the job. Jack Ma has a similar viewpoint. Earlier this year, the Alibaba founder said in a message to his employees that young people should see major tech companies’ overtime work cultures as a “huge blessing.” But not everyone agrees with O’Leary’s work philosophy. While Virgin Group founder Richard Branson has said that the 9-to-5 work week will eventually die off, he believes that people will instead “work smarter, not longer” as more technology is implemented in various industries. If “governments and businesses are clever, the advance of technology could actually be really positive for people all over the world,” Branson wrote in a blog post last year. As a result, he said, people might be able to take up to four-day weekends. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Why Kevin O'Leary Expects His Employees To Work On Vacation
Look Inside Harry Styles' LA Mansion And 7 Other Celeb Estates
Look Inside Harry Styles' LA Mansion And 7 Other Celeb Estates
10 maanden geleden
Take a look inside several celebrity homes in the Southern California area. Stars include: Jessica Alba, Harry Styles, Kelsey Grammer, James Franco, Michael Jackson, Orlando Bloom, Blake Griffin, and Muhammad Ali. Harry Styles bought his LA home for $6.47 million in 2016. After several price cuts he recently sold the gated 4,100 square foot property it for $6 million. In addition to an open floor plan the house features 4 bedrooms and 6 bathrooms, as well as a heated pool and hot tub outside. NBA player Blake Griffin is currently selling an almost $11 million house in Pacific Palisades California. The 6-bedroom, 9,572-square-foot house has an asking price of $10,995,000. It also features a home theater, pool with an entertaining patio, a family game room, and a basketball court. Actress and Honest Company founder Jessica Alba recently put her Beverly Hills home on the market. The nearly 1/2-acre property is going for $6.2 million. The home has 3 bedrooms & 5 baths and it sits in the famous 90210 zip code. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Look Inside Harry Styles' LA mansion And 7 Other Celeb Estates
Can You Tell Cheap Wine From Expensive Wine?
Can You Tell Cheap Wine From Expensive Wine?
10 maanden geleden
Does a higher price tag equal better tasting wine? "Make It" staffers put cheap and expensive wine-ranging from $3.99 to $260-to the test to see if they could tell the difference. The days of limiting yourself to Trader Joe’s “two-buck Chuck” simply because it’s all you can afford are over. Buying a delicious bottle of wine doesn’t have to break your budget. “Price doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with the quality or taste of a wine,” Jon Thorsen, author of the “Reverse Wine Snob,” tells CNBC Make It. In fact, there’s an “incredible amount of good wine” available in the $10 to $20 range, Ray Isle, executive wine editor for “Food & Wine,” tells CNBC Make It. Of course, if you’re a cheapskate and only want to pay a couple of bucks, finding a great-tasting bottle may prove more challenging. Thosen finds great wines under $4 are rare. They may not taste awful, but they probably won’t be something you’ll remember fondly either. There are exceptions: In a recent tasting, several Make It staffers actually preferred Trader Joe’s cheap varieties to the expensive stuff, such as a $150 bottle of Chateau d’Ampuis Côtes du Rhône. Whatever your tastes are, wine experts recommend following these five steps next time you’re shopping to find wines that are both interesting and affordable. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Can You Tell Cheap Wine From Expensive Wine
How This Mom Became Kim Kardashian's Trainer
How This Mom Became Kim Kardashian's Trainer
10 maanden geleden
Melissa Alcantara lost over 40 pounds when she used the Insanity workout videos to lose the baby weight. Her transformation caught the eye of Kim Kardashian, who ultimately signed her on as her personal trainer. In 2013, before Melissa Alcantara became known as the trainer who whipped Kim Kardashian West into shape, she was "super broke," unfit and living as a waitress in Brooklyn, New York. She also was an avid smoker. She then stumbled upon a TV infomercial for Shaun T's popular Insanity workout program and committed 100% to it for 60 days. Her transformation eventually led to her become a competitive bodybuilder that caught the eye of reality star Kim Kardashian West on Instagram in 2017. The pair would later meet, and Alcantara would soon move to Los Angeles to become Kim and Kanye West's full-time trainer. "I feel like J.Lo in some weird movie," she says. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How This Mom Became Kim Kardashian's Trainer
Kevin O'Leary: What I Would Do If I Lost Everything
Kevin O'Leary: What I Would Do If I Lost Everything
10 maanden geleden
Kevin O'Leary explains what he would do if he lost everything and had to start all over again in business. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Kevin O'Leary: What I Would Do If I Lost Everything
Meet The X-Games Medalist Skateboarding Toward the Olympics
Meet The X-Games Medalist Skateboarding Toward the Olympics
10 maanden geleden
Brighton Zeuner became the youngest person to win gold at the X Games one day after her 13th birthday. Now, just a few years older, Brighton is preparing to compete to qualify for the 2020 Olympics. Brighton Zeuner has a Vans sneaker on one foot and a cast, supporting a sprained, on the other. Her look is a clear indication of the two things she loves most: fashion and skateboarding. At just 15 years old, she is excelling at both. At age 12, the competitive skateboarder won the Vans Park Series World Championship and at age 13, she became the youngest athlete in X-Games’ 21-year history to take home gold. Today, she ranks as the third best female skater in the world on The Boardr Global Rankings Report, and she is one of 16 skaters to make it onto the first-ever USA skateboarding team - a coveted spot that places her as a top qualifier for next summer’s 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. The San Diego native’s father and brother both liked to skateboard and taught her how. “My older brother Jack was a skateboarder before me and I think one of the main reasons why I started skateboarding was because of him,” Zeuner says. Her first set of wheels was a makeshift skateboard her mother built from one of Jack’s old boards. “I got my first skateboard when I got back home from a Girl Scout sleepover,” she says. “I think it was my brother’s old board that [my mom] just put trucks on and wheels and I had a mini ramp from my brother. I just went back and forth and that’s when I just fell in love with it.” » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #XGames Meet The X-Games Medalist Skateboarding Toward the Olympics
What It's Like To Star In A Broadway Musical
What It's Like To Star In A Broadway Musical
10 maanden geleden
Michael James Scott stars as the Genie in the Broadway musical "Aladdin" and performs eight shows a week in New York City. We followed him around for a day, here's what it's like starring in a Broadway show. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt What It's Like To Star In A Broadway Musical
Living On $88K A Year In The Bay Area | Millennial Money
Living On $88K A Year In The Bay Area | Millennial Money
10 maanden geleden
Christine Hopkins, 27, lives in Berkeley, CA, and earns $88,000 a year as a marketing manager at Bluewolf, an IBM company. She wasn't always responsible with money, making charges to her credit card without being able to pay them off. In 2018 she began making an effort to change her financial habits. Here's how Christine makes, earns, and spends her money. Read more about Rachel and Scott’s budget breakdown: cnb.cx/2K87pKP This is the latest installment of Millennial Money, which profiles people across the U.S. and details how they earn and spend their money. After making changes to her financial lifestyle, Hopkins now puts away around $2,000 a month into savings, pays down her debt, and still enjoys life in the Bay area. Although a significant portion of her earnings goes toward rent and debt repayment, Hopkins says she never feels like she’s struggling to get by. “I’m able to live pretty comfortably on my salary in Berkeley,” she says. Hopkins began working in the Bay Area as a marketing intern after graduating from college, earning $15 an hour. After her internship ended the company offered her a full-time position for $50,000 a year. When she realized that her debt was not decreasing despite her increase in salary she started working with an advisor at the Financial Gym. Hopkins began treating her savings and debt like bills, putting a certain amount toward each every month. “I have discovered that I actually have a lot more money than I thought to do things like this,” she says. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #MillennialMoney Living On $88K A Year In The Bay Area | Millennial Money
Jordan Rodgers and JoJo Fletcher On How To Make Money From Short-Term Rentals
Jordan Rodgers and JoJo Fletcher On How To Make Money From Short-Term Rentals
10 maanden geleden
Bachlorette JoJo Fletcher and her fiancé Jordan Rodgers are now in the house-flipping business. They host "Cash Pad," a show focused on improving short-term rental properties. Here are their top six tips to make money from short-term rentals. Renting out your home or apartment on sites like Airbnb, VRBO, and Homeaway can help you make extra cash. Airbnb hosts make an average of nearly $1,000 a month according to research from Earnest. Income varied depending on location, how often you rent out your place, and the quality of the rental (plus the services you provide). Being a successful Airbnb or VRBO host takes more than a clever listing and some new sheets. In addition to the work involved, potential Airbnb hosts should consider start-up costs like redecorating and purchasing new beds, mattresses, couches, and other furnishings. Here’s a quick guide on how to get started renting out your place to really maximize your earning potential. 1. Do your homework: Before posting an Airbnb listing or fixing up your space you should research demand in your area and double check that you can legally operate your rental. 2. Spruce up your place: Start by freeing your space of clutter and then furnishing the space. 3. Snap some gorgeous photos: High quality photos of your space is another way “to set yourself up for success,” says Danny Rusteen, founder of OptimizeMyAirbnb.com and a former Airbnb employee. 4. Write a descriptive listing: Think about the type of guest that will appreciate your space the most and write for that audience. 5. Invest in a good check-in experience: Make sure to provide contact information in case of emergencies and provide instructions on the best way to get to your home from the airport, train station, and the local bus or metro stop. 6. Stock up on quality amenities: At the very least, you need excellent WiFi and, depending on the size of your apartment, a WiFi network extender. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt Jordan Rodgers and JoJo Fletcher On How To Make Money From Short-Term Rentals
How To Calculate What To Save And What To Spend
How To Calculate What To Save And What To Spend
10 maanden geleden
Sallie Krawcheck, co-founder and CEO of Ellevest and a former Wall Street executive, breaks down a simple formula to help you figure out how much of your income you should spend and save. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How To Calculate What To Save And What To Spend
How Jeni's Splendid Ice Cream Is Taking Over One Scoop At A Time
How Jeni's Splendid Ice Cream Is Taking Over One Scoop At A Time
10 maanden geleden
Jeni Britton Bauer started Jeni's Splendid Ice Cream in a small stall in Columbus nearly 25 years ago. Today, Jeni's Splendid Ice Cream has 36 scoop shops around the country and sells 2 million pints of ice cream annually. After nearly 25 years in the business, making and selling ice cream has been hardwired into her very essence. And that's due, in part, to her upbringing. "I grew up loving ice cream because I'm from the Midwest," Britton Bauer, tells CNBC Make It. "We don't even think of ice cream as dessert here," she says, adding that it's practically its own food group. Certainly something that you eat every day. Just like drinking coffee in the morning is a sacred ritual, so is enjoying ice cream in the evening. And Britton Bauer's journey toward building a thriving ice cream business started early in life. Britton Bauer vividly recalls the moment her grandmother put her on the path to becoming an ice cream entrepreneur at just 10 years old. "She was standing in the kitchen stirring a pot, and she stopped me in my tracks and said: 'Jeni, you're so lucky because you can be whatever you want to be. You can be a doctor, lawyer, an astronaut. It wasn't like that for me.'" At the time, Britton Bauer simply responded with a "Thanks, Grandma," and darted off. "But I remember, when I when I ran outside - in that moment - I thought, Well if that's true then I'll be an ice cream maker," she recalls. "Ice cream has always been a part of my life, and I think it was meant to be." Even if Britton Bauer was destined to create ice cream - and selling a stunning 2 million pints last year alone suggests she was - that doesn't mean building her business from the ground up was easy. Seven years before Britton Bauer started her own business, she got her first taste of the industry when she took a job at a local ice cream parlor when she was just 15. "I loved it," Britton Bauer says of that first job. Yes, her arms hurt and she got blisters from scooping. "I had to wear gloves the first few weeks," she says. "To this day my right arm is bigger than my left arm, and it all started back then." The part-time job did more than just introduce Britton Bauer to the ice cream business, it acquainted her with the concept of service. "I felt like I could put all of my nervous energy aside and put all of my focus on someone else," she says. "I really believe that's why I make ice cream now. The way that I approach everything in my life is from that point of view of service, because it's where I feel absolutely comfortable." It was while she was attending Ohio State University as an art major that she had an epiphany that would officially lead her down the path to starting her own business: Scent is a vital component of ice cream. "Scent and flavor sort of blooms in ice cream," she says. Once she realized that, she became obsessed with making ice cream at home, blending together essential oils like rose and cayenne with a vanilla or chocolate base. She eventually quit art school - just walked out of art class one day - and started a small shop called Scream Ice Cream in Columbus' North Market in 1996. Britton Bauer spent each day learning on the job, working out of a tiny freezer to create flavors that combined ingredients from other local vendors in the market. One of the first flavors Britton Bauer offered was a salty caramel. She had mastered the art of caramel making while working in a French bakery. And it proved to be a winning recipe for her. "People would drive in from the surrounding states to get it," she says. But the popularity of one flavor did not turn Scream Ice Cream into an instant business success. » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt How Jeni's Splendid Ice Cream Is Taking Over One Scoop At A Time
Mythbusters' Adam Savage Spent $15k Building A Comic-Con Costume
Mythbusters' Adam Savage Spent $15k Building A Comic-Con Costume
10 maanden geleden
Comic-Con cosplay can represent a big investment of time and money. Mythbusters host Adam Savage discusses his favorite costume build that took him over a decade to create and premiere at San Diego's Comic-Con. Adam Savage, the host of Discovery Channel’s “Savage Builds” and former co-host of “Mythbusters,” spent over $15,000 to design and create a copy of his favorite space suit. For years, Savage has attended Comic-Cons across the country in elaborate costumes, but this was by far the most expensive. Among the bigger Comic-Con events are Comic-Con San Diego, Comic-Con New York, Comic-Con Boston, Comic-Con Denver, Comic-Con Chicago, Comic-Con Atlanta, and Comic-Con Dallas. Savage built Kane's suit from the 1979 Ridley Scott movie "Alien." In the movie, executive officer Kane (actor John Hurt) encounters the first alien, which attaches itself to his face and later bursts from his chest in a pivotal scene. After years of working on the project since about 2005 he set a goal of completing the suit and wearing it to San Diego Comic-Con in 2014. Much of the time Savage devoted to the costume came from researching all of the details of the suit. He spent hours watching footage from the movie to figure out what each part of the suit was made from. “I made my own versions of things several different times when I realized that some of my details weren’t correct,” he says. Savage went so far as to source textiles from Italy and China for the different types of woven fabric involved in the costume. Several of the individual pieces are built from scratch. “I hired people to make molds for me. I hired people to make castings for me.” Ultimately, Savage wore the suit while walking around the floor of Comic-Con for only 20 minutes. “That was a new level of hot,” Savage said after the walk. “I don’t think I’m going to go for a suit this hot again.” » Subscribe to CNBC Make It.: cnb.cx/2kxl2rf About CNBC Make It.: CNBC Make It. is a new section of CNBC dedicated to making you smarter about managing your business, career, and money. Connect with CNBC Make It. Online Get the latest updates: www.cnbc.com/make-it Find CNBC Make It. on Facebook: cnb.cx/LikeCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Twitter: cnb.cx/FollowCNBCMakeIt Find CNBC Make It. on Instagram: bit.ly/InstagramCNBCMakeIt #CNBC #CNBCMakeIt #SDCC2019 Mythbusters' Adam Savage Spent $15k Building A Comic-Con Costume
Verzyvers
Verzyvers - 4 uur geleden
Hey Kevin, how is the lawsuit in Muskoka going??? ttyl sailor :)
Creamapera
Creamapera - 4 uur geleden
A thief.
Harry Wang
Harry Wang - 4 uur geleden
He forgot to mention diversification.
Kawaiii. AeRo
Kawaiii. AeRo - 4 uur geleden
4:34 is shiiiiii they brought out the Asians
Goddess
Goddess - 4 uur geleden
@2:22 wtf is wrong with him 😂😂😂
Katherine Z
Katherine Z - 5 uur geleden
More reality than Godaddy employee making 140,000
Catalin Arseniu
Catalin Arseniu - 5 uur geleden
Big error..he is just a scammer!
NecromancerAdr
NecromancerAdr - 5 uur geleden
It's the opposite for me: My Switch is my #1 console while my PS4 is the complement.
Roxy Garcia
Roxy Garcia - 5 uur geleden
Interesting!
liquidnitrogen123
liquidnitrogen123 - 5 uur geleden
Why don’t you guys show a profile of a real blue collar worker making around 30k a year and how they budget? Normal people can’t relate to these six figure salaries. Show some real people working with realistic salaries.
ROHIT MATHUR
ROHIT MATHUR - 5 uur geleden
This house can also be used in Indian horror movies
Macawso
Macawso - 5 uur geleden
I didn’t have a credit or debit card as a teenager. My parents only let me use cash.
Jim Boland
Jim Boland - 5 uur geleden
My dad was a lawyer and my mother was a college professor. My mother’s family are multi millionaires, however they were married in a courtroom.
votivespark
votivespark - 5 uur geleden
So if the study was conducted in 2010 that means happiness at 75000 is now 88,000 in 2020 USD.
Instant Party
Instant Party - 6 uur geleden
Who's idea was it to put a white font onto a white back drop 4:01 can't even see the price on my monitor lol
Villie Stephanov
Villie Stephanov - 6 uur geleden
Good morning America!
Eric Highsmith
Eric Highsmith - 6 uur geleden
Feeling like a failure right now... currently making $0 a year, 30 years old. Lost my job as a shuttle driver due to covid-19. But was only making $12/hr. Keeping my head up though.
Joe Casella
Joe Casella - 6 uur geleden
He was just starting to build up his virus expertise... With Windows 1.0, you guys have to listen to this guy when he talks about viruses and vaccines he has a vast experience...
zico zico
zico zico - 6 uur geleden
It's funny how some gays talk more girly than girls. No insult, just an observation
Deus Benedjx
Deus Benedjx - 6 uur geleden
I currently see myself as a robot that needs to work tirelessly to combat every day or else I'll die. I don't care if anyone doesn't take care of me in the hospital when I get sick one day. I just work today to live (cause I have no choice, I happen to think suicide is a sin) and save money for hospital bills in the future.
Phase Zerosum
Phase Zerosum - 6 uur geleden
If you fly straight up from the south pole with a jetpack are you still going south?
himynameiscyn
himynameiscyn - 6 uur geleden
25 and got 50k 🙃 100k seems too low for 33
Jackson Paflas
Jackson Paflas - 6 uur geleden
Why is someone spending $700 a month on a car? Even if I was rich I don’t think I would have a car with a $700 monthly payment. That’s just insane.
Dolphins101
Dolphins101 - 6 uur geleden
Gotta love the mansplaining going in in the comments below 🙄
Sasha Da Masta
Sasha Da Masta - 6 uur geleden
For the record: 1. I think the uber thing is obviously not a good idea, since that's basically a taxy service, which is obviously expensive. I think what he should have mentioned were things like zipcar or systems like that, where you basically get a car on demand and can use it to run errands whenever you need it, or to go on a weekend trip, but you don't have to worry about all of the trouble that comes with a car. 2. he's obviously not including rural areas, he says the word "city" at least once, and it's obvious through context. I really think people should be looking into car share systems though if you live in the city, not the rural areas, because a car isn't always needed if you can bike to work (most people live so near to their work that they could easily bike, but obviously not everyone can), and you forget about the hassle of all of the costs, keep the freedom of being able to drive a car since the service works 24/7 (don't quote me on that), as well as the parking space, which you could rent if you have one. If you want some opinions, I recommend these two videos: nlmind.info/video/maiCd6WOmKtrjJs.html nlmind.info/video/1HBtmKmPm6p-qrQ.html
Roger
Roger - 7 uur geleden
Millennials checking in
Josue Perez
Josue Perez - 7 uur geleden
Bruhh I’m graduating next year I’m legit getting spooked
ZachHasAUser
ZachHasAUser - 7 uur geleden
i want to buy one but i can’t find it anywhere
Marcus M.
Marcus M. - 7 uur geleden
NIN-ten-DO!!!! NOW YOUR PLAYING WITH POWER!!!!
Karissa Meyers
Karissa Meyers - 7 uur geleden
OMG I love sauna so much. It is like euphoria after the hot and cold contrast
cmartinez89
cmartinez89 - 7 uur geleden
I think a lot of us are just like Elon. We just haven’t sold a company for hundreds of millions of dollars yet.
MJ Mail
MJ Mail - 7 uur geleden
Easy peasy I’ll do sooooooo much more
Sartorius988
Sartorius988 - 8 uur geleden
25 - resident doctor - debt free, 15k in savings :)
Elena Garcia
Elena Garcia - 8 uur geleden
They are so ugly, I wouldn’t wear them even if someone give them to me. No mam!
zbLoodlust087
zbLoodlust087 - 8 uur geleden
Rent? Coming from the man that built his fortune on real estate
The Great Santini
The Great Santini - 8 uur geleden
Elon is the master of the future. Henry Ford, N. Tesla, and Von Braun all in one.
Marcio Cajado
Marcio Cajado - 8 uur geleden
Good actor
someo ne
someo ne - 8 uur geleden
Steve jobs is just like the owner of gucci poeple buy it for the name not for the actual clothes or phones that work good.
fiona QI
fiona QI - 8 uur geleden
Why am I watching this again?
dwasten90
dwasten90 - 8 uur geleden
6 tees and 3 pairs of jeans - this only works with men? lol
dchawk81
dchawk81 - 8 uur geleden
My coffee is for your safety. Had to increase my budget because the cheap stuff is too acidic.
Premfn
Premfn - 8 uur geleden
what is the point of being rich and not spending money. I never understood that
bpln the2nd
bpln the2nd - 8 uur geleden
how many times he said you know ?
Vesna Lukic
Vesna Lukic - 8 uur geleden
She was an alcoholic, that's where all her money went. I save the same amount on half that income and have the same amount of student debts.
Brenda sanchez
Brenda sanchez - 8 uur geleden
Carmela scores 😂
Kaiden Hall
Kaiden Hall - 8 uur geleden
Did he say a car isn’t necessary? This dude doesn’t live in the real world
leyley 12
leyley 12 - 8 uur geleden
These people at there waterpark evryday during quarantine
remytron83
remytron83 - 8 uur geleden
I just pressed play. If they don’t talk about how Dre stole everything from Monster then this is a crap video. Btw, Beats headphones are kinda trash.
IC CE Lover
IC CE Lover - 8 uur geleden
I also love crocs I wear them all the time
The Jones
The Jones - 8 uur geleden
Rip Trader Joe’s aka naked juice :(
Jordan Baldi
Jordan Baldi - 8 uur geleden
the coronavirus probably killed his job lol
The Jones
The Jones - 8 uur geleden
Welp I was going today after going once a week for a grocery turn up but now I’m def going tomorrow lol
Andieniable
Andieniable - 8 uur geleden
Worst headphones ever!!!!!!!
Flak153
Flak153 - 9 uur geleden
Lol 1/3 of my after tax income? The average American would have to move to rural Kentucky for that
HackersSun
HackersSun - 9 uur geleden
To zoomers, first time huh? :P
Me
Me - 9 uur geleden
Ahhh Mr. Wonderful, the Simon Cowell of the financial world! I admire this man so much!
Sinn Sage
Sinn Sage - 9 uur geleden
FEWER* options
Sndip. a
Sndip. a - 9 uur geleden
World.raciest.country.indian.hig.cast...selfish..lier...poltician.corupptetd.temple.brhmins.lier..hindu.lier.all..
JaXXTroNaut
JaXXTroNaut - 9 uur geleden
🇨🇦 Dragons Den
Brenda sanchez
Brenda sanchez - 9 uur geleden
I want to hang out w her
Jim Boland
Jim Boland - 9 uur geleden
I leased my BMW ,and I regretted it. I was over the miles and was nailed.
Manny 91
Manny 91 - 10 uur geleden
It’s beneficial in a highly populated city where finding parking is a hassle/expensive.
kyle watts
kyle watts - 10 uur geleden
Awesome awesome very cool very educational very amazing thank you so much I appreciate it! :-)
Brad Strawn
Brad Strawn - 10 uur geleden
Nintendo isn't really a competitor with microsoft/sony anymore. Not many people are deciding between ps4/xbox or switch. I personally find the switch to be the perfect companion to PC gaming.
Sigifredo Coria
Sigifredo Coria - 10 uur geleden
Took her 25 yrs to hit 42 mill that was long !
Karina Del Real
Karina Del Real - 10 uur geleden
spends 500+ on miscellaneous which is probably considered stuff she doesn't need and 200 on student loan...doesn't seem the best at managing money. not to mention eating out all of the time. Putting 20 grand down on a house when owing 30 grand in school debt is NOT a good idea, basically in a deficit because she owes money. Can CNBC put people on here that are better with their money?
Buddy Muniz
Buddy Muniz - 10 uur geleden
Umm 31 or 46?? Lost me when I saw the word rent. Doesn't cook?? Those tatoos?? See yaa!!
Hellokittylovers10
Hellokittylovers10 - 10 uur geleden
I can’t believe @JessicaBraun was featured lol every time I think of TJ’s I always think of her and her recommendations
Harry Wang
Harry Wang - 10 uur geleden
Kevin OLeary must not realize that his jacket probably cost <100 bucks to manufacture lmao. His hand stitched Saint Laurent jacket was probably made in China with the final touches put on in France.
Ivan Tinoco
Ivan Tinoco - 10 uur geleden
Is nobody going to address the fact that diversity in these countries is almost nonexistent, and that they are all predominantly whites ...
Li Mei Mei lifestyle
Li Mei Mei lifestyle - 10 uur geleden
US food shopping is expensive. Trader Joe would be cheaper by comparison
dchawk81
dchawk81 - 10 uur geleden
The right time to buy a home is when your parents look at you and say "you make more than us. Get out." I was gonna live in my car but Dave Ramsey won't let me buy one.
Lexi Vivid
Lexi Vivid - 11 uur geleden
The Oppenheim Group from “Selling Sunset” on Netflix!?
dchawk81
dchawk81 - 11 uur geleden
I get her theory but if you're gonna keep a car 5+ years anymore you better buy it new or VERY low mileage before anyone had a chance to abuse it. And about 5-10 years in they start to need wear parts replaced. So be ready for that. Either cash or mechanically inclined with tools. 12+ they're probably going to start needing more than they're worth. All depends on luck really these days. They aren't designed to last forever. They never were. It's just that old ones, pre-2000, were easier for the average owner to do significant repairs himself. Eg my '86 pickup is dead simple from nose to tail and parts are cheap. My '18 pickup scares me a little and parts are NOT cheap. Plus there's always the issue of inheriting swamp crotch seats and a COVID-19 HVAC system when you buy used.
dchawk81
dchawk81 - 11 uur geleden
She's right. Jay Leno doesn't have any new cars in his hangar. 😃
Sera the Educated Feline
Sera the Educated Feline - 11 uur geleden
It doesn’t surprise me that a shop that has no loyalty cards, compact space, next to no brands other than own-brand, and reasonable prices is owned by Aldi. Being a Brit who hasn’t been to the US, it shouldn’t be a surprise that I know bugger all about Trader Joes, but believe me, I have plenty of experience with Aldi and Lidl (the two main super-cheap supermarkets we have).
Kai-Uwe Merkel
Kai-Uwe Merkel - 11 uur geleden
You ain't going to get rid of me that easily. I am like athletes foot. Ask Murrar. He can tell. We just do a little swing like Voyager on it's way out of Jupiter's gravity.
Brands of Chloé
Brands of Chloé - 11 uur geleden
Very interesting video! I saw some items I’m going to try in my next Trader Joe’s haul.
Snip-Snip Tear
Snip-Snip Tear - 11 uur geleden
Cons: The Nintendo Dock can scratch the system regardless of its design or careful placement.
Vincent Lin
Vincent Lin - 11 uur geleden
Only 38 comments? This is weird 😂
quadsnipershotp1lvl4
quadsnipershotp1lvl4 - 11 uur geleden
It’s not a bad answer. I agree with the cash back but it depends on what you do and your income level. Most people only need 1 credit card. After a specific income or a more variety of use you can expand
avril14thlove
avril14thlove - 11 uur geleden
Don't understand why she wouldn't just pay off her student loans?
Brands of Chloé
Brands of Chloé - 11 uur geleden
Another great Millennial Money segment! I love that she was so transparent in sharing her account balances before she started earning, and saving more money.
xxNATHANUKxx
xxNATHANUKxx - 12 uur geleden
If you learn to not rely on consumer goods for your happiness, save whilst you are young/live at home and invest all this money you save you set yourself up for financially stable future. The stock market, although volatile does offer great results for your savings over decades and if you save enough you won't have to worry about being able to afford that yearly holiday anymore or even your mortgage because your dividends/growth appreciation will take care of it
B. Davis
B. Davis - 12 uur geleden
I hope they find jobs soon! They are hustlers!
44Wynter
44Wynter - 12 uur geleden
Covid might have been the trigger this time but capitalism is the underlying cause. A fairer social and economic system wouldn't have allowed so many people to fall in to complete financial catastrophe as quickly and brutally as this one.
ZombieLove
ZombieLove - 12 uur geleden
he became a millionare by profiting off of the housing market crash that left so many people homeless.
fabwen foob
fabwen foob - 12 uur geleden
Finland a happy country??? You´re definately far from the truth. And it just shows you never lived in this country. One of the world top country for suicide and alcoholism.......Having a good school system is useless when most of the inhabitants are deeply depressed......and depressing. So... welcome to Finland.........as a tourist of course.
Coc Ca1
Coc Ca1 - 12 uur geleden
Bro i wear them from like 2012
Peter Olejnik
Peter Olejnik - 12 uur geleden
8:11 Kevin looks like he’s saying “you young, punk...you’re doing better than me”. 😂
Alexandra Aspioti
Alexandra Aspioti - 12 uur geleden
That's a reality for many ather countries for many years ,like Greece and Cyprus. Young graduates cant gets job on there field of studies. That's life for our generation. I'm going to bee a economics graduate at 2020 but I already know that I'm not going to find a job in my field of study and probably going to find a job on a caffe or something like that.
clutchkd 90
clutchkd 90 - 12 uur geleden
We are talking about a guy who said that the Air force would be overtaken by drones.
DeSean Kirkland
DeSean Kirkland - 13 uur geleden
Why the black dude gotta get fired lol jk
Nxdav
Nxdav - 13 uur geleden
My guy makes more money than people dream of but he uses none of it
Nula Rayn
Nula Rayn - 13 uur geleden
Love the Grateful tee!!! 😃 I have one too. That 116 crew
Arūnas Jonas Kastėnas
Arūnas Jonas Kastėnas - 13 uur geleden
You sir are my hero. I would love to have such a creative and forward thinking person as a friend.
Altair *
Altair * - 14 uur geleden
He does seem smarter (with technicalities) and with a way more likeable personality than all those others put together.
Wayne
Wayne - 14 uur geleden
Lol does not apply to large metro high populated cities.
des2018
des2018 - 14 uur geleden
you know kevin was probably finding every cook book he could get his hands to learn to cook LOL